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AIIAS Graduate School Course Description


Letter prefixes used for Graduate School courses are:

Graduate School
CPTR Computer skills courses
GSGS General Courses in Graduate School

Department of Business
BUAD Business Administration

Department of Educational Studies
EDAD Educational Administration
EDCI Curriculum and Instruction
EDCP Counseling Psychology
EDIT Instructional Technology
EDLA Library Administration
EDRE Religious Education
EDRM Educational Research
EDUC Educational Foundations

Department of Public Health
PHEL Public Health Elective
PHFN Public Health Foundations
PHHP Public Health, Health Promotion Emphasis
PHHM Public Health, Health Ministry Emphasis
PHNU Public Health, Nutrition Emphasis

Number prefixes used for Graduate School courses are:
500-599 Foundation, introductory, or core courses
600-699 Intermediate and specialized courses
700-799 Advanced courses
800-899 Courses that apply exclusively to doctoral programs

All credits are listed in terms of semester hours. For a listing of Religion courses needed to meet degree requirements, see course listings and descriptions under the Theological Seminary: Areas of Instruction section of this Bulletin.

General Courses

CPTR 101 Keyboarding (2)
An introduction to touch keyboarding, with an emphasis on basic techniques, speed, and accuracy. Students are expected to achieve a minimum typing speed of 28-40 words per minute.

CPTR 201 Word Processing with Powerpoint (2)
An introduction to word processing concepts and terminology. Development of proficiency in word processing applications using Microsoft Word. Skills which would be particularly appropriate for academic or research purposes are emphasized. In addition, MS PowerPoint presentation software concepts and terminology are introduced. Hands-on experience comprises a major part of the teaching/learning process. Prerequisite: Touch typing keyboarding speed of 20 words per minute. A computer laboratory fee will be charged.

CPTR 202 Spreadsheets with Databases (2)
An exposure to spreadsheet applications using MS Excel. Students will learn the capabilities and commands of the spreadsheet program and will apply them to specific projects and problems. This course emphasizes educational applications and problem solving. Hands-on experience comprises a major part in the teaching/learning process. In addition, basic database concepts are introduced using MS Access. Using database management systems, students will help build databases. A computer laboratory fee will be charged.

GSGS 501 Academic Writing (1)
Necessary skills for academic writing, including proper use of sources and avoiding plagiarism, organization, the basics of APA style, punctuation, and gender inclusive language. Academic writing ability and knowledge of research procedure is developed through class activities and feedback.

Individual Studies
The following courses may be offered for each of the degree programs. The degree program prefixes, omitted in this list, must be supplied at the time of registration. Individual studies contracted to be graded on an S/U basis will receive an S if work is evaluated at a B (3.00) or above.

_____ 588/688/788 Updating of (Original Course Name) (0)
Updating an outdated course is registered under the same prefix and first digit as the original course. The charge for this course will be equivalent to the fee for one credit in the student’s program, but no credit will be granted. For details, see the section entitled “Updating of Academic Credits” under Academic Information and Policies.

_____ 689 Elective Course in ____________ (1-3)
This will allow transfer credits and an occasional special course not specifically named in the Bulletin. Transferred courses should still appear as such on the transcript.

_____ 690 Directed Individual Study (1-3)
Open to students only on a limited basis and with departmental approval. Requires written/oral reports. Normally, DIS is limited to 3 units per student per degree. Not available for core subjects without ASAC approval.

_____ 691 Directed Individual Research (1-3)
Open to students only on a limited basis and with departmental approval. A written report is required, normally in the form of a research paper. May be repeated for credit.

_____ 693 Advanced Readings (1-3)
Open to students only on a limited basis and with departmental approval. Requires extensive readings on an agreed topic with oral and written reports to the professor. Normally, Advanced Readings is limited to 3 units per student per degree. No Advanced Readings may be used in lieu of core requirements.

Business

BUAD 515 Methods of Teaching Business (3)
This course is designed to provide students with the tools they will need as teachers to help their students learn. These include an understanding of basic teaching/learning/evaluation processes and strategies, as well as skill in selecting and organizing content and planning lessons. A variety of teaching approaches and techniques which are applicable to the business field are demonstrated and practiced.

BUAD 602 Managerial Communication (3)
The theory and practice of effective communication techniques and strategies in a global work environment are studied. Emphasis is placed on competency in verbal, nonverbal, written, interpersonal, group interaction, and presentation skills. Study is given to ways in which students can adapt their communications to the specific needs of their audiences and make use of new communication technologies. Students are challenged to creatively analyze various communication dilemmas in business and develop sincere, ethical approaches to upward, lateral and downward communication in their organizations.

BUAD 609 Topics in Business Management:_____________ (3)
A study of current issues in Business Management. Students may complete up to a total of three topics courses, i.e., a maximum of 9 semester credits. Only 3 credits may be used in an emphasis.

BUAD 610 Organizational Behavior (3)
Application of behavioral science concepts within a Christian ethics framework. The emphasis is on understanding how individuals and groups behave in organizations, and the development of a moral organizational culture. Topics of interest include perception, values, attitude, motivation, group behavior, communication, leadership, power, politics, conflict, organizational culture, and organizational change.

BUAD 612 Human Resource Management (3)
Integration of human resource programs into organization strategy to support long-term competitive strategies. The emphasis is on the attraction and retention of competent personnel, management of human resource flow, work systems, and reward systems.

BUAD 615 Marketing Management (3)
A course designed to enable the student to develop and implement marketing strategies. Both the local and global marketplace are considered in analyzing marketing opportunities; selecting target markets; designing marketing programs; and organizing, implementing, and controlling marketing efforts.

BUAD 618 Marketing for Not-for-Profit Organizations (3)
Application of marketing concepts and tools to not-for-profit organizations. Concepts and techniques covered include selection of target markets, marketing mix, marketing program development, implementation, and control of marketing strategies.

BUAD 620 Microeconomic Analysis and Decision Making (3)
The application of microeconomics to management decision making and organizational architecture, with special focus on decision rights, performance evaluation, and rewards. Coverage includes decisions on pricing, cost, optimal output levels, product mix, vertical integration, and outsourcing. The impact of government policy on the firm is also studied.

BUAD 622 Economic Issues for Managers (3)
Analysis of current topics and issues in macroeconomics. Topics covered include employment, inflation, fiscal policy, monetary policy, international trade, economic development and issues, new world economic order, and regional economic associations.

BUAD 624 Entrepreneurship (3)
Principles, problems and issues in organizing a new venture in small business. Topics covered include the enterprising spirit, proposal writing, financing, organizing, and operating aspects.

BUAD 626 International Business Management (3)
Analysis of the nature and scope of international business in the global market economy. Topics covered include international business environments, the framework for international transactions, global strategies, and cross-cultural concerns in management.

BUAD 629 Topics in_____________ (3)
A study of current issues in Business. Students may complete up to a total of three topics courses, i.e., a maximum of 9 semester credits. Only 3 credits may be used in an emphasis.

BUAD 635 Quantitative Methods for Operations (3)
A study of quantitative methods for solving management problems. Topics covered include data analysis, probability concepts and applications, breakeven analysis, decision trees, PERT/CPM, queuing theory, statistical quality control, forecasting, inventory systems, linear programming, location analysis, and other topics. Prerequisite: BUAD 632 Business Statistics.

BUAD 638 Financial Forecasting Models (3)
A study of quantitative models using simulation for forecasting and decision making under risk. The course focuses on using the computer to solve complex problems involving uncertainty. Students will become familiar with optimization software, Microsoft Excel’s Solver and Excel plug-ins.
Prerequisites: BUAD 632 Business Statistics; BUAD 635 Quantitative Methods for Operations; and BUAD 640 Financial Management.

BUAD 640 Financial Management (3)
A course focusing on the investing and financing activities of a corporation. Topics covered include the concept and application of risk, return, and value; cost of capital and capital budgeting; working capital management; capital structure; and international aspects of financial management.

BUAD 642 Investments (3)
A study of the securities market, current issues in investment portfolio management, analysis of fixed-income and equity securities, and derivatives as investment alternatives.

BUAD 644 Banking Systems (3)
A study of how banks are prudently managed to comply with Central Bank’s regulations. Principles of prudent management cover topics such as value creation, CAMEL compliance, asset-liability management, loan portfolio management, and related topics.

BUAD 645 Managerial Accounting and Control (3)
Managerial decision making and financial planning through accounting analysis. Special attention is given to cost analysis and control, cost allocation, budgeting, financial analysis, and behavioral aspects of accounting.

BUAD 646 Finance for Not-for-Profit Organizations (3)
Analysis of the financial and economic aspects of the administration of notfor- profit educational institutions, including sources of long-term financing, resource management, planning the use of funds, internal control, capital budgeting, risk and return analysis, and cost control. Credit may not be earned in both EDAD 730 and BUAD 646.

BUAD 648 Not-for-Profit Accounting and Control (3)
A course designed to assist user-decision makers in understanding and applying accounting concepts related to not-for-profit organizations. The course emphasizes the applications of accounting as a tool for management control in non-business organizations. Special attention is given to financial statement presentation, analysis, and interpretation.

BUAD 649 Topics in Financial Management: _____________ (3)
A study of current issues in Financial Management. Students may complete up to a total of three topics courses, i.e., a maximum of 9 semester credits. Only 3 credits may be used in an emphasis.

BUAD 652 Trade Finance (3)
A study of how international trade is financed by banks and how business ventures take advantage of the financing facility. It covers working knowledge of importing, exporting, L/C and related negotiable documents, exchange risk management, country risk, export credit insurance, and related topics.

BUAD 654 Financial Analysis and Reporting (3)
A study of what, how, and where key financial analytical tools are generally used to come up with solutions in management decisions in the areas of investments, finances, and operation. It consists of business performance evaluation, growth analysis, LBO analysis, special evaluation of the firm, M & A, and financial reporting techniques for decision making.
Prerequisite: BUAD 640 Financial Management.

BUAD 656 International Finance (3)
A study of international financial management and its various techniques of how multinational corporations manage their day-to-day affairs in light of exchange risk exposure. It focuses on the international financial environment, foreign exchange risk management, capital markets and financing instruments, and direct foreign investment decisions.
Prerequisite: BUAD 640 Financial Management.

BUAD 658 Financial Risk Management (3)
A study of how corporations safeguard their financial and investment decisions against business risk, foreign exchange exposure, liquidity unavailability, and so on. It focuses on hedging techniques, financial engineering, and insurance management.
Prerequisites: BUAD 640 Financial Management and either BUAD 642 Investments or BUAD 654 Financial Analysis and Reporting.

BUAD 660 Management Information Systems (3)
Students learn to establish, operate, and control integrated, computer based information systems to support management decision making. Topics discussed include structuring of information systems, hardware and software systems, quality assurance, information gathering, storage, retrieval, and control.

BUAD 662 Information Technology Management (3)
Role of information technology in operations, decision making, and learning in organizations. Competitive and economic benefits from managing information technology resources. How information technology can achieve competitive advantage, efficient operations, and improved decision quality.
Prerequisite: BUAD 660 Management Information Systems.

BUAD 668 Telecommunications (3)
The fundamentals of communications, principal telecom technologies, business telecom applications, basic network design concepts, and telecom business issues. The course will start with bits and bytes and move from electrical engineering concepts to systems, protocols, cost and policy issues, and future trends.

BUAD 669 Topics in Information Systems: _____________ (3)
A study of current issues in Information Systems. Students may complete up to a total of three topics courses, i.e., a maximum of 9 semester credits. Only 3 credits may be used in an emphasis.

BUAD 672 Systems Analysis and Design (3)
Provides an understanding of the system development, modification, decision process, and choices in business process development and reengineering methodology. Emphasizes integration with users and user systems. Encourages interpersonal skill development, operations and maintenance of the system, and covers quality and decision theory, information theory, and practice.

BUAD 674 Databases (3)
Covers information systems design, theory and implementation within a database management system environment. Students demonstrate their mastery of the design process by designing and constructing a physical system using database software to implement the logical design.

BUAD 676 Project Management (3)
The course covers project planning and tracking, performance metrics and performance evaluation, as well as recruiting, retention, career planning, team building, quality control, negotiation, risk analysis, and legal issues.

BUAD 681 Digital Imaging and Design (3)
Focuses on using software to manipulate photographic images and design computer-generated graphics. Emphasis will be placed on how to acquire, enhance, and export digital images using both commercial and open source graphics software such as Paint Shop Pro and Gimp, with primary applications in web site development and creation of Internet marketing material. The course will further introduce concepts of image preparation for press, composition, digital photography, photo scanning, and graphics animation. Class size will be limited. Requires payment of a computer laboratory fee.

BUAD 682 E-Commerce (3)
An introduction to electronic commerce with emphasis on designing web sites for marketing and selling activities. Topics covered include fundamentals of design for the World Wide Web, graphics standards, hosting the site, and use of web-commerce service providers for hosting a virtual storefront and/or collection of payments. Experience is gained using web authoring software for HTML coding such as Microsoft FrontPage, and NVu. Students are required to complete an individual project and to form consulting teams to assist small businesses in establishing a web presence. Class size will be limited. Requires payment of a computer laboratory fee.
Prerequisite: BUAD 681 Digital Imaging and Design, or BUAD 674 Databases. BUAD 681 is strongly encouraged.

BUAD 684 Network Design and Implementation (3)
An introductory course to local area networking (LAN) that provides participants with a solid foundation in the basic technology, terminology, concepts, and principles of network design and implementation. Attention is to the decision-making process encountered when contemplating the set-up of a local area network. The course gives students hands-on applications to reinforce theory and develop necessary skills.
Prerequisite: BUAD 668 Telecommunications.

BUAD 695 Strategic Planning and Policy (3)
Through case analysis, the course offers students the opportunity to practice acquired skills in formulating solutions to real life management problems. Emphasis is placed on environmental analysis together with strategy formulation, implementation, and control. Central to the course is the need to align organizational practice with the vision and mission.

Note: This is the capstone course for the MBA program and can only be taken after substantial completion of all other requirements, usually in the last semester, just prior to graduation. It is integrative in nature, requiring the student to put to use the skills and knowledge gained throughout the course of study.

BUAD 696 Research Project (3)
Guided independent research project to demonstrate the student’s skills in research procedures, analysis, and decision making. Selected project formats may include feasibility studies, case studies, and the development of problem-solving approaches in other management functional areas.
Prerequisite: Completion of all required courses, or with permission of the advisor.

BUAD 697 Internship (1-4)
Students who have less than two years of managerial work experience may spend up to 240 clock-hours in a business-related internship (spread over a period of 3-6 months) in a chosen organization with the approval of the department. At the end of the internship the student is required to produce a report about the experience gained and the contribution made to the organization.

BUAD 698 MBA Thesis (3-6)
Guided independent research to demonstrate the student’s skills in the use of the research design. The research process typically includes description of the problem and purpose of the study, limitations/delimitations, literature review, methodology, data presentation and analysis, conclusions, and recommenddations. Included in the thesis credits is a seminar in research during which the thesis proposal is developed.
Prerequisite: BURM 610 Research Methods; and completion of all required courses, or with permission of the advisor.

BUAD 720 History of Management Thought (3)
Historical and contemporary theories of administration and their application in an Asian context. Credit cannot be earned in BUAD 720 and EDAD 720.

BUAD 725 Change and Crisis Management (3)
Examines contemporary theories and practice in managing change and preventing and managing crisis. The focus is on applying theoretical concepts from the fields of organizational behavior and strategic human resource management (HRM) to the practical challenges of managing organizational change and transformation. Several conceptual frameworks for analyzing the character, impact, and consequences of crises will be presented and applied to a variety of private and public sector case studies. Using a multidisciplinary approach, the seminar will explore the dynamics of crisis decision making and the multifaceted consequences of crisis.
Prerequisite: BUAD 610 Organizational Behavior.

BUAD 730 Quality Management (3)
Provides a strategic and structured approach to designing, monitoring, and improving business processes to enhance organizational performance and increase customer satisfaction. Topics include quality perspectives, quality theory, quality standards and awards, quality planning, customer focus, benchmarking, product and process design, service quality design, supply chain management, quality tools, quality improvement teams and projects, statistical process control, process capability, quality training, quality audits, and organizational learning.
Prerequisites: Principles of management and statistics.

BUAD 735 Ethics, Values and Moral Leadership (3)
A blend of theoretical and real-world situations designed to enable the student to understand and apply moral theory to personal and professional life. This is accomplished through reading, research, interaction with other students and classroom presentations.

BUAD 740 Seminar in Financial Management (3)
A study of research in the field of financial management practices in the areas of corporate, government and SDA organizational policies. The course is comprised of the following subjects: the institutions affecting the practice of financial management, corporate short-term and long-term financing, including that of mergers and acquisitions for financial growth; money and banking, including how the Bureau of Treasury raises government’s financing; and prudent financial policies implementation in an SDA organization through the financial statement analysis according to the General Conference policies. The students are required to present the above mostly in the form of financial research presentation, which culminates into scholarly presentation as well as publication.
Prerequisite: BUAD 640 Financial Management.

BUAD 760 Seminar in Information Technology Management (3)
Leading edge Information Technology management issues will be addressed. Topics will vary as technology evolves, but could include virtual teams, knowledge management, justifying IT investments, business process change through technology, web-based systems, software project management, outsourcing, and evolving IT management roles.
Prerequisite: BUAD 660 Management Information Systems.

BUAD 890 Graduate Seminar in Business (3)
Special research topics in business. Topics vary from term to term depending on the interests of the instructor and students. May be repeated if topics vary.

BUAD 898 PhD Dissertation (3-12)
Research on topic of the doctoral dissertation. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only. May be repeated.
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

Business Research

BURM 610 Research Methods (3)
Fundamental processes of research. This course introduces students to the terminology, methods, and tools of scholarly research. Specific topics include characteristics of historical, descriptive, quasi-experimental, and experimental research; measurement considerations as related to validity, reliability, generalizability, instrumentation, and data analysis; and ethical concerns. The course also addresses the practical aspects of writing a thesis/project proposal, gathering data, organizing the report, and presenting the findings. Credit may not be earned in both EDRM 610 and BURM 610.
Prerequisite: GSGS 501 Academic Writing.

BURM 620 Nonparametric Statistics (3)
Theory and application of nonparametric methods for analysis of nominal and ordinal data and distribution-free tests, including rank tests for matched and independent samples, chi-square and goodness-of-fit tests, McNemar’s test, rank correlation, k-sample test, randomizations test, Kolmogorov- Smirnov statistics.
Prerequisites: EDRM 615 Statistics I or equivalent, EDRM 610 Research Methods, GSGS 501 Academic Writing recommended. Credit may not be earned in both EDRM 620 and BURM 620.

BURM 630 Documentary Research (3)
Documentary and historical methods in obtaining primary and secondary information as well as verifying and using it in research. Credit may not be earned in both EDRM 630 and BURM 630.
Prerequisites: GSGS 501 Academic Writing, EDRM 610 Research Methods.

BURM 632 Advanced Statistics (3)
Theory and application of ANOVA with repeated measures, analysis of covariance, introduction to multiple regression, two-way ANOVA (including Friedman Two-Way ANOVA by Ranks), multivariate and discriminant analyses, and other factorial methods. Students will be introduced to and expected to develop proficiency in using a major statistical package. A computer laboratory fee will be charged. Students who took basic statistics more than 5 years ago must audit BURM 615 or pass a proficiency examination before enrolling in this class. Credit may not be earned in both EDRM 632 and BURM 632.
Prerequisites: BURM 615 and proficiency in word processing and spreadsheet use.

BURM 640 Construction of Scales and Survey Instruments (3)
Theoretical and empirical study of the development of (1) survey instruments such as questionnaires and interview schedules, and (2) attitude scales and personality instruments. Topics include principles and procedures of survey methodology, sampling techniques and sample size, reliability and validity, scaling, item analysis and selection, nonresponse problems, data coding and processing, and presentation of results. Practical experience gained by completing an instrument and/or completing a survey project. A computer laboratory fee will be charged. Credit may not be earned in both EDRM 640 and BURM 640.
Prerequisite: EDRM 615 Statistics I or equivalent.

BURM 680 Qualitative Research (3)
Theory, methodology, and applications of qualitative research. Training in the utilization of qualitative research methods will be provided, with emphasis upon participant observation and ethnographic interview. The course focuses on understanding the philosophical underpinnings of qualitative research methods, developing an understanding of the “self“ as a viable research instrument, and gaining practical experience with qualitative methods in research through the development of a primary qualitative study. Credit may not be earned in both EDRM 680 and BURM 680.
Prerequisites: GSGS 501 Academic Writing, EDRM 610 Research Methods.

BURM 710 Applied Multivariate Analysis (3)
Theory of multivariate normal distribution, discriminant analysis, principal components analysis, factor analysis, and canonical correlation with emphasis on application of these analyses and interpretation of results. Credit may not be earned in both BURM 710 and EDRM 710.
Prerequisite: BURM 632 Advanced Statistics.

BURM 730 Research Design (3)
Principles and methodologies of research directed toward the dissertation and subsequent professional research. Topics include the role of research within a discipline, the ethics of conducting research, the rationale behind various research types and designs, the viability of alternative methods of observation and data collection, and defensible analysis and interpretation of research data. The course also deals with such practical concerns as the research proposal, the dissertation committee, the final research report, the dissertation defense, and subsequent avenues for publication and further dissemination of the findings. Students will prepare and present a research proposal. Credit may not be earned in both BURM 730 and EDRM 730.
Prerequisites: GSGS 501 Academic Writing, EDRM 610 Research Methods, EDRM 615 Statistics I or equivalent, BURM 632 Advanced Statistics recommended.

BURM 880 Research Experience (3)
Hands-on experience in designing, conducting, and reporting significant research in education. The end product should be a publishable scholarly article (2,000-3,000 words) or other substantial research report. The student should plan to spend a minimum of 60 clock hours in research activities for each semester hour of credit. Credit may not be earned in both EDRM 880 and BURM 880.
Prerequisites: GSGS 501 Academic Writing, EDRM 610 Research Methods.

Educational Studies


Educational Administration

EDAD 530 Foundations of School Administration (3)
A study of major opportunities, threats, and trends in the administration of elementary and secondary schools. An analysis of leadership skills required in the development of the school in such areas as the school program, human relations, facilities, and finances. Includes a study of the legal rights, roles, and responsibilities of the various stakeholders in the educational endeavor.

EDAD 601 Supervision of Instruction (3)
A review of theories of supervision, as well as practical and pragmatic approaches to the real problems principals and others face in their attempts to become effective instructional leaders. This course will provide superintendents, principals, and other educational supervisors with insights and skills in helping teachers in their activities with children and youth.

EDAD 610 Organizational Behavior (3)
Application of behavioral science concepts within a Christian ethics framework. Emphasis is on understanding how individuals and groups behave in organizations, and the development of a moral organizational culture. Topics of interest include perception, values, attitudes, motivation, group behavior, communication, leadership, power, politics, conflict, organizational culture, and organizational change.

EDAD 640 Administrative Finance (3)
Essential concepts of financial management and their applications. Course topics include capital budgeting, financing alternatives, management of working capital and liquidity, and issues in strengthening the financial condition of an institution.

EDAD 645/745 Master Planning of Educational Facilities (3)
A comprehensive study of the process of developing functional educational facilities. Among the topics considered are the preliminary development plans and the master plans as related to long-range and strategic planning of educational campuses, and the development of educational specifications as a basis for architectural planning.

EDAD 650 Human Resource Management (3)
This course is designed to assist educational leaders in acquiring knowledge and developing skills related to personnel function. Emphasis is placed on selection, morale, interpersonal relations, communication, conflict management, work and reward systems, and motivation of teachers. Identical to BUAD 612.

EDAD 651 Principalship and School Improvement (3)
The study of leadership based on principles and theories of the administration of schools. The course includes a study of leadership opportunities and responsibilities in the areas of purpose, direction, accountability, organization, management, personnel relationships, student problems and services, and school community relations. It also includes a study of planning and implementing change for school improvement.

EDAD 674 School Organization and Law (3)
The study of the school as an organization within an educational system. The course will address issues such as the dynamics of group processes, the role and function of effective leadership for school organization, legal issues affecting teachers and educational administrators including church state issues, school board operations, teacher employment, and student welfare.

EDAD 692 Fieldwork in Educational Administration (3)
See Department of Educational Studies—Departmental Policies and Guidelines for a description of the nature and requirements of this course.

EDAD 694 MA Project (3)
See Department of Educational Studies—Departmental Policies and Guidelines for a description of the nature and requirements of this course.

EDAD 698 MA Thesis (3-6)
See Department of Educational Studies—Departmental Policies and Guidelines for a description of the nature and requirements of this course. A total of 6 semester hours must be taken.

EDAD 720 Theory of Administration (3)
Historical and contemporary theories of administration and their application in an Asian context.

EDAD 730 Financial Management for Educational Institutions (3)
An analysis of the financial and economic aspects of the administration of educational institutions, including sources of long-term financing, resource management, planning the use of funds, internal control, capital budgeting, risk and return analysis, and cost control.
Prerequisite: EDAD 640 Administrative Finance. Credit may not be earned in both EDAD 730 and BUAD 646.

EDAD 733 Seminar in Institutional Finance (3)
A case study approach to relevant financial concepts with selected applications to solve financial problems in the not-for-profit sector, especially in educational institutions. Topics included are investing and financing decisions, financial analysis, budgeting, and management control.

EDAD 742 Marketing for Not-for-Profit Organizations (3)
Application of marketing concepts and tools to not-for-profit organizations. Concepts and techniques covered include selection of target markets, marketing mix, marketing program development, implementation, and control of marketing strategies. Same course content as BUAD 618.

EDAD 750 Seminar in Administration and School Improvement (3)
A team-led seminar that focuses on areas of perceived student needs and interests in educational administration and school improvement.

EDAD 786 Administration in Higher Education (3)
Emphasizes principles of administration, financial support, staffing, program development, organization, and evaluation, as well as planning for academic, student, and developmental activities. Includes objectives and trends for higher education in developing countries.

EDAD 792 Advanced Fieldwork in Educational Administration (3)
See Department of Educational Studies—Departmental Policies and Guidelines for a description of the nature and requirements of this course.

EDAD 799 EdS Project (3-6)
See Department of Educational Studies—Departmental Policies and Guidelines for a description of the nature and requirements of this course. A total of 6 semester hours must be taken.

EDAD 870 Independent Research in Educational Administration (2-4)
See Department of Educational Studies—Departmental Policies and Guidelines for a description of the nature and requirements of this course.

EDAD 877 Independent Project in Educational Administration (2-4)
See Department of Educational Studies—Departmental Policies and Guidelines for a description of the nature and requirements of this course.

EDAD 899 PhD Dissertation (3-15)
See Department of Educational Studies—Departmental Policies and Guidelines for a description of the nature and requirements of this course. A total of 15 semester hours must be taken.

Curriculum and Instruction

EDCI 501 Methods of Learning and Instruction (2)
Explores the various aspects of thinking and knowing, of learning and the implications of differing views of instruction. Consideration is given to the major theories and research on the development of human learning. Students with no previous credit in instructional methodology or teaching experience may be required to take this course as a prerequisite for EDCI 615. This course may not count toward the required hours for the MA in Education degree.

EDCI 510 Teaching Practicum (1-3)
The purpose of the practicum is to provide students with practical experience in teaching. Activities will include classroom observation, preparation and delivery of learning activities, grading of assignments, and administrative responsibilities. Credits earned in this course do not apply towards the hours required for graduation from the MA in Education.

EDCI 520 Methods of Teaching Elementary _______ (2-3)
Principles, content, and skills in teaching the selected subject area at the elementary level. Students may take up to 6 credits of methods courses, with a maximum of 3 credits in a specific content area.

EDCI 521 Methods of Teaching Secondary _______ (2-3)
Principles, content, and skills in teaching the selected subject area at the secondary level. Students may take up to 6 credits of methods courses, with a maximum of 3 credits in a specific content area.

EDCI 522 Methods of Integrating Literacies (3)
This course is designed to prepare reflective practitioners who will be able to refine, revise, and adapt their practice to better engage learners in using a full range of literate practices. Literacy includes the interpretation, appreciation and evaluation of information from written texts, numeric data, technology, media and images, together with an acknowledgement of issues underlying multicultural texts, such as inequality, bias, power, culture, and social practices. This course focuses on developing personal critical literacy skills, learning how to teach literacy to students in the elementary or secondary classroom, and ideas for integrating literacy skills into every class in the curriculum.

EDCI 601 Supervision of Instruction (3)
See EDAD 601 for course description.

EDCI 610 Classroom Management (3)
A comprehensive view of classroom management in relation to the approaches to developing social responsibility in the youth within the framework of redemptive methodologies and training. This includes areas such as creating a proper learning environment, understanding student academic and psychosocial needs, establishing positive teacher-studentparent and peer relationships, student motivation, student discipline, establishing rules and procedures, and maximizing on-task behavior.

EDCI 615 Advanced Instructional Strategies (3)
This course is designed to broaden the instructional repertoire of teachers and other educational leaders interested in improving the teaching/learning process by combining an in-depth knowledge of the subject matter, an understanding of learning processes, decision-making abilities, human relations skills, and appropriate communication techniques into a unified act, resulting in enhanced learning for students. The course incorporates a workshop approach in which the power and usefulness of a variety of teaching models are examined, and which allows the application of specific teaching/learning strategies in a supportive environment.

EDCI 620 Foundations of Curriculum (3)
Philosophical, historical, psychological and sociological foundations that shape curriculum practices. This course includes an introduction to the literature, theories, and designs of curriculum. The approach will be analytical and theoretical, attempting to clarify the relationship between theory and practice.

EDCI 625 Instructional Media (3)
Philosophical, technical, ethical, and practical issues in using technology in the classroom. The course emphasizes both developing technical skills in technological areas appropriate to education, as well as exploring the educational advantages and disadvantages of using technology. Topics include the selection, production, utilization, and evaluation of audio, graphic, and electronic educational materials. Students will develop educational materials using technology, and present them publicly. A computer laboratory fee will be charged.

EDCI 632 Instruction of the Exceptional Child (3)
An exploration of the approaches that can be used by teachers for inclusion of exceptional children, including gifted children, into the regular classroom setting. The characteristics of enabling conditions will be analyzed, and appropriate educational programs and issues of assessment will be addressed. Current trends and the impact of legislation upon special education practices, including inclusion, will be reviewed. Techniques for dealing with different levels of ability within the classroom will be examined.

EDCI 640 Process of Curriculum (3)
A comprehensive introduction to the process of curriculum, incorporating content, process, product, affect, and learning environment. This course examines the assessment, design, construction, implementation, evaluation, modification, and differentiation of curricula at various educational levels. Special emphasis will be given to procedures for instructional evaluation. Course participants will construct a mini-curriculum guide in an area for which no written curriculum exists.

EDCI 645 Instructional Evaluation (3)
The manner in which evaluative procedures contribute to the teaching/learning process and to the improvement of educational decisions. Topics include measurement theory; the alignment of evaluative procedures with teaching objectives; diagnostic, formative, and summative evaluation; the assessment of ability, achievement, aptitude, interest, and personality; alternative forms of evaluation, such as process and product assessment; the interpretation of standardized test data; the reporting of evaluative results; and trends and issues in instructional evaluation.

EDCI 685 E-Learning (3)
Educational issues specific to online learning, both as a supplement to or a substitute for face-to-face interaction. Attention is given to principles and strategies of teaching and learning online and how they differ from traditional methods, curriculum and instructional design issues relating to online environments, online assessment strategies and tools, and an introduction to administrative and technical support, together with actual course development applications. The course will provide students with hands-on actual experience in an online environment.
Prerequisites: a graduate course in curriculum, and EDCI 625 Instructional Media.

EDCI 692 Fieldwork in Curriculum and Instruction (3)
See Department of Educational Studies—Departmental Policies and Guidelines for a description of the nature and requirements of this course.

EDCI 694 MA Project (3)
See Department of Educational Studies—Departmental Policies and Guidelines for a description of the nature and requirements of this course.

EDCI 698 MA Thesis (3-6)
See Department of Educational Studies—Departmental Policies and Guidelines for a description of the nature and requirements of this course. A total of 6 semester hours must be taken.

EDCI 730 Advanced Curriculum Theory (3)
Streams of curricular thought based on extant literature. Consideration is given to the shifts of perspective in curricular theory over time, primarily throughout the twentieth century, leading to the present; the relationship of curriculum theory to major philosophical frameworks and assumptions; the interaction of the commonplaces of curriculum, and the dominant models of curriculum.
Prerequisite: EDCI 620 Foundations of Curriculum or EDCI 640 Process of Curriculum

EDCI 750 Seminar in Curriculum and Instruction (3)
Current and emerging topics in curriculum and instruction within a seminar format. The course will consist of structured discussions, research based presentations, and presentations of position papers.

EDCI 770 Program Evaluation (3)
An explanation of and justification for evaluation strategies at both departmental and institutional levels, from the perspective of both the practitioner and the evaluator. The course emphasizes the building of evaluation criteria, self-study, methods of data collection, organization and analysis, the drawing of inferences and the framing of recommendations consistent with the mission and philosophy of the institution or program being evaluated.

EDCI 771/772/773 Curriculum Development (3)
A focus on curriculum design and construction, seeking to aid educators concerned with the creation and revision of curriculum for elementary, secondary, or tertiary levels. Attention is given to the application of theoretical principles to curriculum design, construction, implementation, and evaluation. Course participants will engage in the development of significant curricular products.
Prerequisite: EDCI 620 Foundations of Curriculum or EDCI 640 Process of Curriculum

EDCI 785 E-Learning (3)
Educational issues specific to online learning, both as a supplement to or a substitute for face-to-face interaction. Research and discussion about principles and strategies of teaching and learning online and how it differs from traditional methods, curriculum and instructional design issues relating to online environments, online assessment strategies and tools, and an introduction to administrative and technical support, together with actual course development applications. The course will provide students with hands-on actual experience in an online environment, as well as a theoretical basis for understanding learning in the electronic age. Credit may not be earned in both EDCI 685 and EDCI 785.
Prerequisites: a graduate course in curriculum, and EDCI 625 Instructional Media.

EDCI 792 Advanced Fieldwork in Curriculum and Instruction (3)
See Department of Educational Studies—Departmental Policies and Guidelines for a description of the nature and requirements of this course.

EDCI 799 EdS Project (3-6)
See Department of Educational Studies—Departmental Policies and Guidelines for a description of the nature and requirements of this course. A total of 6 semester hours must be taken.

EDCI 870 Independent Research in Curriculum (2-4)
See Department of Educational Studies—Departmental Policies and Guidelines for a description of the nature and requirements of this course.

EDCI 872 Independent Research in Instruction (2-4)
See Department of Educational Studies—Departmental Policies and Guidelines for a description of the nature and requirements of this course.

EDCI 875 Independent Project in Elementary Curriculum (2-4)
See Department of Educational Studies—Departmental Policies and Guidelines for a description of the nature and requirements of this course.

EDCI 876 Independent Project in Secondary Curriculum (2-4)
See Department of Educational Studies—Departmental Policies and Guidelines for a description of the nature and requirements of this course.

EDCI 877 Independent Project in Tertiary Curriculum (2-4)
See Department of Educational Studies—Departmental Policies and Guidelines for a description of the nature and requirements of this course.

EDCI 899 PhD Dissertation (3-15)
See Department of Educational Studies—Departmental Policies and Guidelines for a description of the nature and requirements of this course. A total of 15 semester hours must be taken.

Last Updated on Monday, 17 May 2010 08:06
 
Adventist International Institute of Advanced Studies, Lalaan I, Silang, Cavite 4118, Philippines
Telphone: 63 46 4144 300 Fax: 63 46 4144 301 Email: scribe@aiias.edu