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Graduate School

Welcome!

It is not easy to be a good professional in our days. Many lack the background and the skills to face the challenges of this day. New approaches and techniques are constantly developing; unprecedented movements emerge; circumstances change abruptly.

This calls for continuing personal and professional growth. Equipping students with the necessary tools to become independent in this arduous task is one of the primordial goals in the Graduate School as we educate teachers, administrators, men and women in business, and health professionals.

Even of greater concern for us is to deliver education that promotes Bible-based values, ethics, principles and practice in all professions. We believe that integrating this understanding into the every-day work (whether denominational or not) is the best way to perform highly and to be of best service.

If you are interested in thorough and affordable education within a Christian perspective, the  Graduate School at AIIAS is a place to explore.

 

Cordially yours,

William Green

Public Health

 

Electives

PHEL 566 Introduction to Human Nutrition (3)

A study of the basic nutritional requirements of the human body and the effects of inadequate nutrition on the health status of the individual. Includes topics such as the basic food groups, macronutrients and micronutrients, recommended dietary allowances, digestion and metabolism, and the relationship between physical fitness and nutrition.

PHEL 567 Nutritional Metabolism (3)

A study of the static and dynamic aspects of metabolism of nutrients and their functions within a normal healthy human.

PHEL 662 Principles of Nutrition Education (3)

Teaching methods and strategies appropriate to a nutrition educator. This course includes definition of effective teaching, the learning environment, lesson design, use of teaching models and strategies to improve student motivation and retention of information, and evaluation of learning outcomes. Laboratory. Field experience.

PHEL 664 Nutrition in the Life Cycle (3)

This course explores the role of nutrition in human growth and development, and throughout the life cycle. Influences of socioeconomic, cultural, and psychological factors on food and nutritional behavior are discussed.

PHEL 665 Concepts of Nutritional Epidemiology (3)

This course prepares students to conduct investigation of diet-disease relationships. Topics include variation in diet, measurement errors and correction for its effects, dietary assessment techniques, dietary assessment tool design and development, and total energy intake analysis. Prerequisites: PHFN 620, PHFN 615.

PHEL 666 Applied Nutrition (3)

The practical application of principles of nutrition including nutrition assessment and evaluation, cooking schools, and food preparation workshops. Students are expected to be actively involved as participants so as to develop practical skills. Field experience.

PHEL 671 Topics in Health Science (1-3)

In-depth study of the scientific aspect of specific health topics such as the immune system, HIV and AIDS, etc. Faculty as well as guests with specialized expertise will contribute to this course.

PHEL 672 Integrated Home Health Care (3)

The study and practical application of current concepts and methods of home-based primary health care. Emphasis is placed on simple techniques for disease prevention and relief of common symptoms, primarily through natural remedies.

PHEL 674 Mental Health and Stress Management (3)

An examination of the principles of mental health and hygiene, the effect of the mind on personal health, and the role of psychosocial and environmentally induced stress in the etiology of illness. How to identify non-psychiatric diseases and psychiatric diseases, emphasizing diagnosis and referral. A major focus is on methods and programs of intervention for effective stress management.

PHEL 675 Components of Public Health Science (3)

An introductory survey of major components of public health science, including epidemiology, environmental health, infectious diseases, bio-statistics, and health administration. Students obtain a broad picture of public health, showing how various dimensions are interrelated and integrated.

PHEL 678 Topics in Family Health (3)

Selected topics in the area of family health, including women’s issues, aging, migration, problems in parenting, child and spousal abuse and their prevention, and crises at critical stages of the life cycle.

PHEL 679 Disease Prevention Through Physical Fitness (3)

An introduction to the principles of exercise physiology and the role of regular physical fitness programs in the prevention of acute and chronic diseases, and in promoting mental and learning abilities, and overall well-being. The focus of the course is on lifestyle planning.

PHEL 680 Integrated Community Development (3)

An examination of health factors and how they interrelate with other factors in the development of communities. Issues of environment, poverty, gender, justice and equity will be studied for their role in individual and family health. The course will incorporate field trips to observe institutions and agencies implementing agricultural, nutritional, educational, livelihood and other projects. Field experience.

PHEL 681 Smoking Cessation Workshop (3)

A comprehensive study of smoking and tobacco as a major public health hazard. The course examines how the tobacco industry perpetuates dependency on vulnerable populations, and the impact of advertising, promotion, and political activity. A major focus of the course is on successful methods and programs for combating tobacco addiction. Field experience.

PHEL 682 Applied Communication Techniques (3)

A study of the principles of effective communication for motivating behavior change, including both oral communication and the preparation and use of audiovisual materials. Basic experience in utilizing the media for health promotion is gained, including preparing press releases, public service announcements, news stories, feature articles, and the use of advertisements. Field experience.

PHEL 685 Addiction Determinants and Control (3)

This course explores the dynamics of chemical dependency, including the psychological, physiological, and spiritual bases of addiction, and intervention modalities. Students are expected to observe or participate in an addiction intervention program. Field experience.

PHEL 686 Seminar in Health Promotion (1-3)

Special topics in public health promotion and education are reviewed. Specialists with expertise in critical areas will be invited to make presentations. Students are expected to choose a current public health topic, research the topic, and make presentations in class.

PHEL 687 Grant Proposal Writing (2)

A review of the principles of project development and their application in the preparation of a written proposal for an applied project. The proposal should conform to standards that are acceptable to funding organizations. Writing skills are applied in preparing summary reports and evaluations which are accurate, concise, and convincing.

PHEL 689 Health Care Administration (3)

A discussion of the principles of administration in the context of prevailing health care systems and primary health care. The course analyzes the structure and function of government and nongovernment health care programs, evaluates their impact on the health of communities, and proposes models to enhance effective and efficient delivery of health services. Field experience.

PHEL 694 Special Individual Project (1-4)

The individual student pursues a topic of interest under the guidance of a faculty member. May include a literature review, reading assignments, and/or other special projects.

 

Public Health Core

PHFN 600 Health Promotion Theory and Practice (3)

An overview of theories and principles of Health Promotion, and an exposition of methods and procedures for planning community intervention programs. A special attention is given to the writing of goals and objectives, understanding of program types, application of the laws of learning, and of the behavioral component in the Health Promotion process.

PHFN 605 Planning and Evaluating Health Promotion Programs (3)

A study of the process of planning health promotion programs. Builds on the principles laid down in PHFN 600. The course emphasizes methods of imple-menting and evaluating programs, such as community organization and involvement, program design, social marketing, management, health communication, and process, impact and outcome evaluation.. Prerequisite: PHFN 600 Health Promotion Theory and Practice.

PHFN 610 Principles of Environmental Health and Disaster Management (3)

A study of environmental factors and how they interact with agent and host factors in the causation, prevention, and control of disease in human populations and appropriate technologies for intervention. Focus is on water supply, sanitation; industrial and solid waste management, vector control and atmospheric pollution control. The course will also include a review of the types and public health consequences of natural and man made disasters, principles of emergency planning, including evacuation procedures, management of disaster casualties, control of disease outbreaks and meeting the physical and psychological needs of disaster victims. Steps in disaster response and recovery and coordination of emergency relief operations will also be reviewed.

PHFN 615 Principles of Epidemiology (3)

This course is a study of the general principles involved in understanding the frequency, distribution, and etiology of acute and chronic diseases, and the method for disease surveillance and control. Emphasis is on the epidemiology of lifestyle-related diseases.

PHFN 620 Biostatistics (3)

An introduction to the fundamental methods of collecting, organizing, and presenting data for community assessment and health interventions. Includes the study of central tendency and variation, sampling, t tests, chi-squared tests, simple and multiple regression, confidence intervals, correlations, and making statistical inferences for analyzing health data.

PHFN 621 Research Methods (3)

See RESM 610 for course description.

PHFN 625 Maternal-Child Health and Family Planning (3)

Preventive and therapeutic concepts of maternal and child health including reproductive physiology, prenatal and neonatal care, and child growth and development. Concepts of planned parenthood are studied, along with a review of the role of contraceptive technologies together with their moral, social, cultural, political, and ethical implications. Maternal and child health issues are also studied in terms of their social and environmental causes, and their impacts on life prospects and on the social and economic welfare and development of the family, community and nation. Successful maternal and child health programs are discussed. 

Health Ministry

PHHM 655 Lifestyle Diseases and Risk Reduction Programs (3)

This course examines the etiology and development of major lifestyle diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, cancer, obesity, nutritional disorders, and selected infectious diseases. Emphasis is on identifying risk factors and examination of successful risk-reduction programs. Field experience.

PHHM 684 Issues in Science and Religion (3)

See CHPH 684 for course description.

PHHM 691 Field Learning Internship (3)

A practical field experience where the MPH student will work as an intern in five different settings, doing a variety of tasks. Internship activities will be chosen to complement and broaden the student’s learning experiences, as they will work directly with or under health professionals and educators in a new or ongoing health program, activity or facility, as part of a team. Prerequisite: all MPH course work is successfully completed.

PHHM 695 Health Evangelism (3)

This course is designed to be combined with an evangelistic series that has a health component built into it. Student participation in a health evangelism event will be supplemented with classroom instruction which includes a rationale for health evangelism, basic planning of the program, budget building, advertising, and audio-visual aids for health evangelism. May be taken in place of CHMN 550 Field Evangelism.

PHHM 698 MPH Thesis (3-6)

Guided independent research to demonstrate the student’s skills in the use of the research design. The research process typically includes description of the problem and purpose of the study, limitations/delimitations, literature review, methodology, data presentation and analysis, conclusions, and recommendations. A total of 6 semester hours must be taken.

 

Health Promotion

PHHP 550 Anatomy and Physiology (2)

A study of the major systems of the human body to appreciate their orderliness and consistency, and their interactions with one another to control the dynamics of health and disease

PHHP 640 Public Health Nutrition (3)

A study of the principles of nutritional science and their application to the health of the public throughout the life cycle. Also examines local and international policies and programs of intervention for the prevention and control of nutrition-related diseases. Field experience.

PHHP 645 School and Adolescent Health (3)

The course is a study of the biological, psychological, social and spiritual changes that occur among young people during school ages and adolescence and the impact of these changes that is of public health concern. It will explore major health issues unique to these groups and create strategies to assist them in rational decision making and providing programs to maintain health. It will include mechanisms of health and disease. This course requires field work.

PHHP 655 Lifestyle Diseases and Risk Reduction Programs (3)

See PHHM 655 for course description.

PHHP 660 Current Global Health Issues (3)

An overview of current issues in global health, including the impact of globalization on health, poverty, culture, conflict and the problem of refugees, food security and nutrition, environment and climate change, population growth and urbanization, HIV/AIDS, chronic diseases, infectious diseases and the special concerns of maternal and child health based on the available data and student self experience.

PHHP 691 Field Learning Internship (3)

See PHHM 691 for course description. 

PHHP 698 MPH Thesis (3-6)

See PHHM 698 for course description. 

 

Nutrition

PHNU 600 Nutritional Status Assessment (3)

This course introduces the student to the dietary, anthropometric, biochemical, and clinical methodologies to assess nutritional status at the individual and community levels. Includes principles and practice of nutrition counseling. With laboratory. Field experience.

PHNU 610 Advanced Nutrition I: Carbohydrates and Lipids (3)

A study of the digestion, absorption, function, metabolism, and control of metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids. This course develops a thorough understanding of the nutrition of carbohydrates and lipids and their applications to selected nutrition-related diseases that have public health impact, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer. Prerequisite: PHEL 567 Nutritional Metabolism.

PHNU 611 Advanced Nutrition II: Proteins, Vitamins, and Minerals (3)

A study of the nutrition, metabolism, and function of proteins, vitamins, and minerals and their applications to understanding the relationship between nutrition and health and disease. Prerequisite: PHEL 567 Nutritional Metabolism or  3 units of Biochemistry.

PHNU 640 Public Health Nutrition (3)

See PHHP 640 for course description.

PHNU 691 Field Learning Internship (3)

See PHHM 691 for course description.

PHNU 698 MPH Thesis (3-6)

See PHHM 698 for course description.

Business

______Topics in _____ (1-6)

A study of current topics, issues and debates in the discipline. Emergent themes and competing ideas in contemporary literature will be covered to give students a wider perspective of the subject area. Students may complete up to a total of three topics courses, i.e., a maximum of 9 semester credits. Only 3 credits, from a level, may be used in an emphasis. PhD level registration will involve a deeper exploratory readings and study on the current issues.

BUAD 501 Accounting (3)

This course is an introduction to the basic concepts and standards underlying financial and managerial accounting systems. Several important concepts will be studied in detail, including: accounting cycle, cost concepts, financial statement analysis, revenue recognition, inventory, long-lived assets, present value, and long term liabilities.

BUAD 502 Management (3)

This course is designed to be an overview of the major functions of management. Emphasis is on planning organizing, controlling, directing, and communicating. Upon completion, students should be able to work as contributing members of a team utilizing these functions of management.

BUAD 503 Economics (3)

 

This course provides an introduction to a broad range of economic concepts, theories, and analytical techniques. It considers both microeconomics - the analysis of choices made by individual decision-making units (households and firms) - and macroeconomics - the analysis of the economy as a whole. The use of a market, supply and demand model will be the fundamental model in which trade-offs and choices will be considered through comparison of costs and benefits of actions. Production and market structure will be analyzed at the firm level. Macroeconomic issues regarding the interaction of goods and services markets, labor and money at an aggregate level will be modelled. The role of government policy to address microeconomic market failures and macroeconomic objectives will be examined.

 

Accounting

ACCT 645 Managerial Accounting and Control (3)

Managerial decision making and financial planning through accounting analysis. Special attention is given to cost analysis and control, cost allocation, budgeting, financial analysis, and behavioral aspects of accounting.

ACCT 648 Accounting for Non-Profit Organizations (3)

A course designed to assist user-decision makers in understanding and applying accounting concepts related to not-for-profit organizations. The course emphasizes the applications of accounting as a tool for management control in non-business organizations. Special attention is given to financial statement presentation, analysis, and interpretation.

ACCT 651/652 Financial Accounting I, II (3), (3)

These two courses involve in-depth study of accounting theories and practices relating to asset, liability, and equity measurements and reporting; revenue and expense determination; and preparation and presentation of financial statements. The courses cover topics that were covered in intermediate accounting but in much greater depth. They are designed for MBA students who will be taking up work in organizational accounting and finance, and denominational accounting and treasury positions.

ACCT 654 Financial Analysis and Reporting (3)

A study of what, how, and where key financial analytical tools are generally used to come up with solutions in management decisions in the areas of investments, finances, and operation. It consists of business performance evaluation, earnings per share (ESP) growth analysis, LBO analysis, special evaluation of the firm, M & A, and financial reporting techniques for decision making. Prerequisite: FNCE 640 Financial Management.

ACCT 657 Fund Accounting (3)

A course designed to assist user-decision makers in understanding and applying accounting concepts related to not-for-profit organizations. Thecourse emphasizes the applications of accounting as a tool for management control in non-business organizations. Special attention is given to financial statement presentation, analysis, and interpretation.

ACCT 660 Auditing and Assurance (3)

A study of auditing theory, historical and current developments including statements of auditing standards and other pronouncements of the audit profession, examination of the concepts and problems including ethics and responsibilities. Emphasis is placed on the application of theory to problem solving and cases. Contemporary professional issues including auditing through the computer and statistical sampling will also be examined.

ACCT 675 Accounting for Corporate Structures (3)

These two courses involve in-depth study of accounting theories and practices relating to asset, liability, and equity measurements and reporting; revenue and expense determination; and preparation and presentation of financial statements. The courses cover topics that were covered in intermediate accounting but in much greater depth. They are designed for MBA students who will be taking up work in organizational accounting and finance, and denominational accounting and treasury positions.

ACCT 680/780 Financial Accounting Theory (3)

An in-depth study, analysis and evaluation of accounting theory (theory and method, measurement and accounting theory construction); alternative models to the historical model of accounting; empirical research in accounting: (positive theory of accounting) and accounting regulation (conceptual framework and accounting standards); and other specific issues. Graduate registration involves a study of advanced Accounting Theory, Prerequisite: Financial Accounting II

ACCT 685/785 Current Issues & Developments in Accounting (3)

This course is designed to cover current issues and developments in financial accounting. The topics covered depend on the current issues in the field of financial accounting. It is designed to familiarize students with current issues and problems facing the accounting profession, to examine in depth various solutions proposed by accounting scholars and others, and to strengthen students’ understanding of today’s critical issues in accounting theory. Graduate registration involves a study of advanced issues in accounting. Pre-requisite: Financial Accounting II

 

Business

BUAD 595 Business Practicum (3)

Students who have less than one year of full-time work experience are required to spend at least 160 clock hours in a business-related practicum in a chosen workplace with the approval of the business department. At the end of the business practicum the student is required to produce a report about the experience gained and the contribution made in the assigned workplace.

BUAD 615 Marketing Management (3)

A course designed to enable the student to develop and implement marketing strategies. Both the local and global marketplace are considered in analyzing marketing opportunities; selecting target markets; designing marketing programs; and organizing, implementing, and controlling marketing efforts.

BUAD 618 Marketing for Not-for-Profit Organizations (3)

Application of marketing concepts and tools to not-for-profit organizations. Concepts and techniques covered include selection of target markets, marketing mix, marketing program development, implementation, and control of marketing strategies.

BUAD 635 Quantitative Analysis for Decision Making (3)

This course offers the opportunity to apply mathematical models and tools for the analysis of business problems and management decision making. It acquaints students with quantitative techniques commonly used in the decision-making process. Sample topics include concepts of decision making and decision analysis, linear programming, sensitivity analysis, transportation and assignments, problem forecasting and time series analysis, inventory concepts, network models, and mathematical simulations and game theory.

BUAD 691 Strategic Management (3)

This course provides the students with theory and practice in strategic management by the use of lectures and case analysis. It helps build in students critical business skills of planning and managing strategic activities. Topics include determining mission, purpose and philosophy of companies, developing a company profile, conducting a resource analysis, assessing the external environment, identifying various strategic options, making strategic analysis and choice, setting long-term objectives, developing long-term annual objectives and grand strategies, implementing strategic decisions, reviewing, and finally, controlling them.

Note: This is the capstone course for the MBA program and can only be taken after substantial completion of all other requirements, usually in the last semester, just prior to graduation. It is integrative in nature, requiring the student to put to use the skills and knowledge gained throughout the course of study.

BUAD 694 Master’s Project (3)

Masters Project may be taken as a culminating activity for MSA students. The course is designed to give students experience in enhancing practice in the workplace. Master’s Projects involve problem identification, antecedents or root cause analysis, literature review, alternative solution generation, intervention recommendations, and project impact evaluation. Candidates registering for BUAD 694 Masters Projects are required to do the following:

1. Identify the problem in practice,

2. Research the antecedents of the problem from the perspective of practitioners,

3. Research from literature the reasons why the problem exists,

4. Generate possible solutions to solving the problem (at least three),

5. Recommend solution to address the problem and provide justifications,

6. Design an intervention that would implement the suggested solution, and

7. Measure the intervention’s effectiveness.

BUAD 696 Research Project (3)

Guided independent research project to demonstrate the student’s skills in research procedures, analysis, and decision making. Selected project formats may include feasibility studies, case studies, and the development of problem-solving approaches in other management functional areas. Prerequisite: Completion of all required courses, or permission of the program director.

BUAD 697 Internship (1-4)

Students who have less than two years of managerial work experience may spend up to 240 clock-hours in a business-related internship (spread over a period of 3-6 months) in a chosen organization with the approval of the department. At the end of the internship the student is required to produce a report about the experience gained and the contribution made to the organization.

BUAD 698 MBA Thesis (3-6)

Guided independent research to demonstrate the student’s skills in the use of the research design. The research process typically includes description of the problem and purpose of the study, limitations/delimitations, literature review, methodology, data presentation and analysis, conclusions, and recommendations. Included in the thesis credits is a seminar in research during which the thesis proposal is developed. Prerequisite: RESM 610 Research Methods and completion of all required courses, or permission of the program director.

BUAD 730 Quality of Knowledge Management (3)

Provides a strategic and structured approach to designing, monitoring, and improving business processes to enhance organizational performance and increase customer satisfaction. Topics include quality perspectives, quality theory, quality standards and awards, quality planning, customer focus, benchmarking, product and process design, service quality design, supply chain management, quality tools, quality improvement teams and projects, statistical process control, process capability, quality training, quality audits, and organizational learning.

BUAD 735 Ethics, Values, and Moral Leadership (3)

A blend of theoretical and real-world situations designed to enable the student to understand and apply moral theory to personal and professional life. This is accomplished through reading, research, interaction with other students and classroom presentations.

BUAD 778 Advanced Management Decision Tools (3)

This course reviews the traditional paradigm for decision-making and then builds different perspectives to decision-making that will enhance the quality of the decisions achieved. This is an advanced course in decision making and it assumes that students who enroll in this course are competent in quantitative analysis for decision-making. Topics include hypothesis testing, Bayesian view of covariance, probability theory and calibration, heuristics and biases, normative decision theory, prospect theory, decision biases, emotions in decision making, morality, forecasting, simulation, scenario generation, uncertainty and risk, happiness, and improving decision making.                  

BUAD 785 Leadership and Corporate Governance (3)

        A critical examination of traditional, contemporary, and Biblical leadership theories and concepts. It will also evaluate the relative advantages and disadvantages of different approaches to leadership, recognize current trends and development in leadership and apply advanced leadership skills to different organizational situations. The focus will be on leadership roles such as visioning, mentoring, team building, making ethical judgments with informed analysis/reasoning, leading change, leading during crises and influencing business behaviour in an ethical manner towards organizational goals and mission. The course will also critically evaluate the theories of corporate governance, Corporate Social Responsibility, and their empirical testing. A distinction will be made between good and bad corporate governance. The student will also learn to analyse the mechanisms of corporate governance and evaluate the role of internal gatekeepers and external regulators in ensuring good Corporate Governance. Further, the course will also discuss the mechanism by which shareholders, Board of Directors, CEOs, managers, and other stakeholders direct and control corporations and organizations.

BUAD 890 Biblical and Ethical Perspectives of Business Issues (3)

A study of current business issues addressed from a biblical and ethical perspective. The aim of this course is to equip students with the ability to develop a Biblical and ethical perspective of any business issues and to articulate it clearly and comprehensively. The course purposes to develop in students the ability to perceive, understand, and discern any business issue from a Biblical and ethical point of view. The students will learn to connect, analyze, and evaluate business issues on the basis of ethical philosophies, moral principles, and common sense logic. Further, Biblical themes and scriptural foundation will be used to make value judgment on contemporary business issues. This course may be taught from a methodological perspective where the focus is on building Bible-based ethical framework for decision making.

Business Informational Technology

BUIT 660 Management Information Systems (3)

Students learn to establish, operate, and control integrated, computer based information systems to support management decision making. Topics discussed include structuring of information systems, hardware and software systems, quality assurance, information gathering, storage, retrieval, and control.

BUIT 662 Information Technology Management (3)

Role of information technology in operations, decision making, and learning in organizations. Competitive and economic benefits from managing information technology resources. How information technology can achieve competitive advantage, efficient operations, and improved decision quality. Prerequisite: BUIT 660 Management Information Systems.

BUIT 672 Systems Analysis and Design (3)

Provides an understanding of the system development, modification, decision process, and choices in business process development and reengineering methodology. Emphasizes integration with users and user systems. Encourages interpersonal skill development, operations and maintenance of the system, and covers quality and decision theory, information theory, and practice.

BUIT 674 Database Applications and Business Analytics (3)

Covers information systems design, theory and implementation within a database management system environment. Students demonstrate their mastery of the design process by designing and constructing a physical system using database software to implement the logical design. Analytics has been defined as the extensive use of data, statistical and quantitative analysis, explanatory and predictive modes, and fact-based management to drive decisions and actions. It is a process of transforming data into actions through analysis and insights in the context of organizational decision making and problem solving. Analytics includes a range of activities including business intelligence, which is comprised of standard and ad hoc reports, queries and alerts' and quantitative methods, including statistical analysis, forecasting/extrapolation, predictive modelling (such as data mining), optimization and simulation.

BUIT 681 E-Marketing (3)

Principles of digital imaging and design for the production of marketing materials. The focus of this course includes concepts such as digital image preparation, corporate identity, consumer behavior, website analysis and internet behavior, digital marketing, and the digital economy. Various marketing, and communication strategies for internet marketing will also be investigated and evaluated. Students will develop an e-marketing plan, a video production, a personal website, and various marketing materials. Class size will be limited. Requires payment of a computer laboratory fee. Credit may not be earned in both BUAD 681 and EDIT 681.

BUIT 682 E-Business (3)

An introduction to electronic business with a focus on business planning, e-strategy and implementation, and project assessment for online business. Topics covered include fundamentals of e-commerce, principles of Web design, and online business strategy and management. Students will explore and evaluate web technology tools for online business, and discuss various trends and issues in electronic business. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking and evaluation skills as well as managerial and entrepreneurial skills. Students will form business/consulting teams to plan, develop, launch, and maintain an online business, or assist a small business in establishing a web presence. Class size will be limited. Requires payment of a computer laboratory fee. Credit may not be earned in both BUIT 682 and EDIT 682.

BUIT 684 Telecommunications, Networking, and Security (3)

Fundamentals of telecommunications, basic network design, and network security concepts in organizations are discussed. The course will include a general introduction to networking technology for setting up local area network for the organization. Information security principles covered will include network, data, and personal security. Implications of network access and security issues for organizations and their members will be discussed.

BUIT 692 Fieldwork in Information Technology

Fieldwork in the area of information technology provides students with experiences closely relating IT theory and practice. The fieldwork experience may take a number of forms: IT Management assistance and consultation, working as part of a team in the development of IT projects, or the preparation and presentation of an IT seminar. In any case, the setting and activities are especially designed to accommodate the student’s interests and needs.

If IT Management assistance and consultation modality is chosen, the student is expected to assist the IT management. The purpose of this modality is for the student to put into practice various IT strategies that have been learned. The student is given preference as to what department and institution in which to carry out the fieldwork, subject to availability.

The development of IT project modality typically involves collaboration with a professional or team of professionals in planning, designing, constructing, field testing, modifying, and evaluating an IT project. Such involvement will often extend over a period of several months.

In the seminar modality, the fieldwork typically focuses on the development, implementation, and evaluation of an IT seminar of at least 10 clock hours which responds to an assessed need evident in the field. Comprehensive instructional materials are to be developed for both the seminar instructor and participants. A formal evaluation of the seminar is to be conducted and documented. The final product resulting from the fieldwork experience should reflect recommended modifications.

BUIT 760 Seminar in Information Technology Management (3)

Leading edge Information Technology management issues will be addressed. Topics will vary as technology evolves, but could include virtual teams, knowledge management, justifying IT investments, business process change through technology, web-based systems, software project management, outsourcing, and evolving IT management roles. Prerequisite: BUIT 660 Management Information Systems.

 

Economics

ECON 620 Microeconomic Analysis and Decision Making (3)

The application of microeconomics to management decision making and organizational architecture, with special focus on decision rights, performance evaluation, and rewards. Coverage includes decisions on pricing, cost, optimal output levels, product mix, vertical integration, and outsourcing. The impact of government policy on the firm is also studied.

ECON 622 Economic Issues for Managers (3)

Analysis of current topics and issues in macroeconomics. Topics covered include employment, inflation, fiscal policy, monetary policy, international trade, economic development and issues, new world economic order, and regional economic associations.

ECON 765 Advanced Economic Theory (3)

Covers selected topics in microeconomics, macroeconomics, international trade, developmental economics and labor economics. Emphasis will be on reading, analyzing, critiquing and synthesizing recent ideas published in current journal articles on economic related issues.

 

Finance

FNCE 638 Financial Forecasting Models (3)

A study of quantitative models using simulation for forecasting and decision making under risk. The course focuses on using the computer to solve complex problems involving uncertainty. Students will become familiar with optimization software, Microsoft Excel’s Solver and Excel plug-ins. Prerequisites: Business Statistics; BUAD 635 Quantitative Analysis for Decision Making; and FNCE 640 Financial Management.

FNCE 640 Financial Management (3)

A course focusing on the investing and financing activities of a corporation. Topics covered include the concept and application of risk, return, and value; cost of capital and capital budgeting; working capital management; capital structure; and international aspects of financial management.

FNCE 642 Investments (3)

A study of the securities market, current issues in investment portfolio management, analysis of fixed-income and equity securities, and derivatives as investment alternatives as pre-requisite knowledge for a better comprehension to financial risk management.

FNCE 644 Banking Systems (3)

A study of how banks are prudently managed to comply with Central Bank’s regulations. Principles of prudent management cover topics such as value creation, CAMEL (capital, assets coverage/quality, management,earnings capacity/quality, and liquidity) compliance, asset-liability management, loan portfolio management, and related topics.

FNCE 646 Finance for Not-for-Profit Organizations (3)

Analysis of the financial and economic aspects of the administration of not-for-profit educational institutions, including sources of long-term financing, resource management, planning the use of funds, internal control, capital budgeting, risk and return analysis, and cost control. The course will also include an extensive discussion on Ellen G. White’s writings on prudent finances. Credit may not be earned in both EDAD 730 and FNCE 646.

FNCE 648 Accounting for Non-Profit Organizations (3)

See ACCT 648 for course description.

FNCE 652 Trade Finance (3)

A study of how international trade is financed by banks and how business ventures take advantage of the financing facility. It covers working knowledge of importing, exporting, L/C (letter of credit facility) and the related negotiable documents, exchange risk management, country risk, export credit insurance, and related topics.

FNCE 654 Financial Analysis and Reporting (3)

A study of what, how, and where key financial analytical tools are generally used to come up with solutions in management decisions in the areas of investments, finances, and operation. It consists of business performance evaluation, earnings per share (ESP) growth analysis, LBO analysis, special evaluation of the firm, M & A, and financial reporting techniques for decision making. Prerequisite: FNCE 640 Financial Management.

FNCE 656 International Finance (3)

A study of international financial management and its various techniques of how multinational corporations manage their day-to-day affairs in light of exchange risk exposure. It focuses on the international financial environment, foreign exchange risk management, capital markets and financing instruments, and direct foreign investment decisions.

FNCE 657 Fund Accounting (3)

See ACCT 657 for course description.

FNCE 658 Financial Risk Management (3)

A study of how corporations safeguard their financial and investment decisions against business risk, foreign exchange exposure, liquidity unavailability, stock and commodity prices fluctuation, interest rates fluctuation, and so on. It focuses on hedging techniques, special financial engineering for special financial problem solving and insurance management. Prerequisites: FNCE 640 Financial Management and either FNCE 642 Investments or FNCE 654 Financial Analysis and Reporting.

FNCE 740 Seminar in Financial Management (3)

A study of research in the field of financial management practices in the areas of corporate, government and Adventist organizational policies. The course is comprised of the following subjects: the institutions affecting the practice of financial management, corporate short-term and long-term financing, including that of mergers and acquisitions for financial growth; money and banking, including how the Bureau of Treasury raises government’s financing; and prudent financial policies implementation in an Adventist organization through the financial statement analysis according to the General Conference policies. The students are required to present the above mostly in the form of financial research presentation, which culminates into scholarly presentation as well as publication. Prerequisite: FNCE 640 Financial Management.

Management

MGMT 602 Managerial Communication (3)

The theory and practice of effective communication techniques and strategies in a global work environment are studied. Emphasis is placed on competency in verbal, nonverbal, written, interpersonal, group interaction, and presentation skills. Study is given to ways in which students can adapt their communications to the specific needs of their audiences and make use of new communication technologies. Students are challenged to creatively analyze various communication dilemmas in business and develop sincere, ethical approaches to upward, lateral and downward communication in their organizations.

MGMT 610 Organizational Behavior (3)

Application of behavioral science concepts within a Christian ethics framework. The emphasis is on understanding how individuals and groups behave in organizations, and the development of a moral organizational culture. Topics of interest include perception, values, attitude, motivation, group behavior, communication, leadership, power, politics, conflict, organizational culture, and organizational change.

MGMT 612 Human Resource Management (3)

Integration of human resource programs into organization strategy to support long-term competitive strategies. The emphasis is on human resource planning, attracting, selecting and retaining competent personnel, managing human resource flow, training and development, performance appraisal, employee welfare and compensation, labor relations, collective bargaining, discipline handling, and dispute resolution.

MGMT 624 Entrepreneurship (3)

Principles, problems and issues in organizing a new venture in small business. Topics covered include creating entrepreneurial spirit, generating business ideas, writing business plans, analyzing feasibility, financing startups, organizing small scale businesses, and operating a new enterprise.

MGMT 626 International Business Management (3)

Analysis of the nature and scope of international business in the global market economy. Topics covered include international business environments, the framework for international transactions, global strategies, and cross-cultural concerns in management.

MGMT 676 Project Management (3)

The course covers project planning and tracking, performance metrics and performance evaluation, as well as recruiting, retention, career planning, team building, quality control, negotiation, risk analysis, and legal issues.

MGMT 720 Management Thought and Philosophy (3)

Historical and contemporary theories of administration and their application in today's world. Particular attention is focused on the context (history, politics, religion, economics, geography) in which the theories emerge, and their implications for Christians. The course aims to provide an understanding of the major philosophical and theoretical underpinnings of management thinking and practice. Credit may not be earned in both MGMT 720 and EDAD 720.

MGMT 725 Change and Crisis Management (3)

Examines contemporary theories, conceptual frameworks and best practices in managing organizational change and preventing and managing crisis. The course will enhance student’s competence in the area of understanding trends, identifying needs for change, overcoming resistance for change, designing programs for change, implementing change, sticking change, spreading change and controlling change. Further, it will also prepare students in anticipating crisis and its impact, planning for crisis, developing a crisis plan, managing crisis when and if it happens and learning from crisis. Prerequisite: MGMT 610 Organizational Behavior.

Education

 

Educational Administration

EDAD 530 Foundations of School Administration (3)

A study of major opportunities, threats, and trends in the administration of elementary and secondary schools. The course includes an analysis of leadership skills required in the development of the school in such areas as the school program, human relations, facilities, and finances. It also includes a study of the legal rights, roles, and responsibilities of the various stakeholders in the educational endeavor.

EDAD 601 Supervision of Instruction (3)

An overview of the principles and processes of supervising instruction within the framework of teacher growth and development. This course explores the rationales, assumptions, processes and implications related to a variety of instructional supervision practices and contexts associated with supervision of instruction and teacher growth. Same course content as EDCI 601.

EDAD 610 Organizational Behavior (3)

A study of human behavior in organizations and its implications for management decisions and actions. Topics include perception, values, attitudes, motivation, group behavior, communication, leadership, power, politics, conflicts, organizational culture and change. Same course content as MGMT 610.

EDAD 640 Instutitional Finance (3)

Basic concepts of accounting and reporting, analysis, and interpretation of financial statement (working capital and liquidity), variance analysis of income statements and expenditure, principles of time value of money, and budgeting, an introduction to costing principles, and issues in strengthening the financial condition of an institution. (Not applicable to the MBA degree).

EDAD 650 Human Resource Management (3)

See MGMT 612 for course description.

EDAD 651 Principalship and School Improvement (3)

The study of leadership and its dynamics as it applies to the administration of elementary and secondary schools, highlighting planning and implementing change for school improvement. The course explores the principal’s role in providing moral, relational, instructional, and administrative leadership within the context of a school’s culture and in the management of the school's resources such as human resources, financial resources, instructional resources, and others.

EDAD 674 School Organization and Law (3)

A study of the principles of K-12 school law. The course addresses legal issues affecting teachers and principals including church-state issues, school board operations, teacher employment, and student welfare.

EDAD 729 Topics in ______ (1-6)

A study of current topics, issues and debates in the discipline. Emergent themes and competing ideas in contemporary literature will be covered to give students a wider perspective of the subject area.

EDAD 730 Financial Management for Educational Institutions (3)

An analysis of the financial and economic aspects of the administration of educational institutions, including sources of long-term financing, resource management, planning the use of funds, internal control, capital budgeting, risk and return analysis, and cost control. Prerequisite: EDAD 640 Administrative Finance. Credit may not be earned in both EDAD 730 and FNCE 646.

EDAD 742 Marketing for Not-for-Profit Organizations (3)

Application of marketing concepts and tools to not-for-profit organizations. Concepts and techniques covered include selection of target markets, marketing mix, marketing program development, implementation, and control of marketing strategies. Same course content as BUAD 618.

EDAD 750 Seminar in Administration and Institutional Development (3)

A team-led seminar that focuses on areas of perceived student needs and interests in educational administration and institutional improvement.

EDAD 780 Disciplinary Research Topics in Administration Policy/Management (2-4) 

Critical analysis of the research literature within a selected disciplinary topic. Classical and emerging literature are analyzed. Both a broad scan and a focused review of the literature are conducted. The purpose is to lay the foundation for the dissertation literature review. This course must be taken before, or concurrently with, EDAD 897. 

EDAD 786 Administration in Higher Education (3)

A study of governance in higher educational institutions and current trends for higher education in developing and developed countries. The course emphasizes leadership roles and principles in establishing administrative structures and processes for distinctive futures in academic programs and learning outcomes, instructional resources, student services, financial support, staffing, professional development, and evaluation.

Curriculum and Instruction

EDCI 515 Teaching and Learning in Higher Education (3)

An introductory course designed to prepare subject matter specialists to teach at the tertiary level. It focuses on characteristics of the adult learner and methods of teaching appropriate to higher education. The course is designed for those without an education background, and for that reason, in addition to teaching methods, it addresses topics such as instructional planning and design, curriculum, course outlines and lesson planning, evaluation, the selection and preparation of learning materials, and the use of technology in teaching, as well as research on best practices in adult learning.

EDCI 520 Methods of Teaching Elementary _______ (2-3)

A study of principles, content, strategies, materials, technology, and current research related to the teaching of the selected content area at the elementary level. This course deals with the development of a sense of the professional landscape in the content areas at the respective levels, understanding of research-based teaching strategies, use of modern technologies, connecting the content area with other academic disciplines, strengthening commitment to service through education, and trends and issues related to the content areas. Students may take up to 6 credits of methods courses, with a maximum of 3 credits in a specific content area.

EDCI 521 Methods of Teaching Secondary _______ (2-3)

A study of principles, content, strategies, materials, technology, and current research related to the teaching of the selected content area at the secondary level. This course deals with the development of a sense of the professional landscape in the content areas at the respective levels, understanding of research-based teaching strategies, use of modern technologies, connecting the content area with other academic disciplines, strengthening commitment to service through education, and trends and issues related to the content areas. Students may take up to 6 credits of methods courses, with a maximum of 3 credits in a specific content area.

EDCI 530 Instructional Planning & Evaluation (3)

Principles and practices for organizing classroom instruction and evaluation of learning. The course will provide theoretical as well as hands-on experiences in the three phases of instruction: preplanning, unit and lesson planning, and post-lesson activities. The preplanning phase of instruction includes the selection of content and resources, and the needs of the learners. The unit and lesson planning phase deals with the process of instructional planning, methods of teaching, and ongoing assessment strategies. Selection of appropriate instructional evaluation procedures will be included in the post-lesson phase of instruction.

EDCI 601 Supervision of Instruction (3)

See EDAD 601 for course description.

EDCI 610 Classroom Management (3)

A comprehensive view of classroom management. This includes areas such as understanding student academic and psychosocial needs, establishing positive teacher-student-parent and peer relationships, student motivation, discipline, establishing rules and procedures, and maximizing on-task behavior.

EDCI 615 Instructional Models (3)

Designed to increase the teaching repertoire of teachers and other instructional leaders interested in improving instruction. The power and usefulness of research-based teaching models are presented. The emphasis is on developing a repertoire of complex teaching models or strategies of teaching/learning through guided practice and feedback. Participants develop their ability to reflect on their own teaching performance and provide effective feedback and support to others. (Prerequisite: EDCI 526). 

EDCI 620 Foundations of Curriculum (3)

Philosophical, historical, psychological and sociological foundations that shape curriculum practices. This course includes an introduction to the literature, theories, and designs of curriculum. The approach will be analytical and theoretical, attempting to clarify the relationship between theory and practice.

EDCI 622 TESOL Methods for Content-Area Reading and (3)

See EDTE 622 for course description.

EDCI 625 Instructional Media (3)

Philosophical, technical, ethical, and practical issues in using technology in the classroom. The course emphasizes both developing technical skills in technological areas appropriate to education, as well as exploring the educational advantages and disadvantages of using technology. Topics include the selection, production, utilization, and evaluation of audio, graphic, and electronic educational materials. Students will develop educational materials using technology, and present them publicly. A computer laboratory fee will be charged.

EDCI 632 Inclusive Instruction (3)

An exploration of the approaches that can be used by teachers for inclusion of exceptional learners, including gifted learners, in the regular classroom setting. The characteristics of enabling conditions will be analyzed, and appropriate educational programs and issues of assessment will be addressed. Current trends and the impact of legislation upon special education and inclusive practices will be reviewed. Strategies and methodsfor dealing with different levels of ability within the regular education classroom will be examined.

EDCI 640 Process of Curriculum (3)

A comprehensive introduction to the components of curriculum development. This course examines the process and product aspects of curriculum for schools. Students will learn the basic theory and skills of conceptualizing, designing, constructing, implementing, and evaluating curriculum. The course will include issues of curriculum change, and the roles of curriculum participants and specialists in all curriculum activities. Students will create original curriculum documents within a limited scope.

EDCI 645 Instructional Evaluation (2-3)

The manner in which evaluative procedures contribute to the teaching/learning process and to the improvement of educational decisions. Topics include measurement theory; the alignment of evaluative procedures with teaching objectives; diagnostic, formative, and summative evaluation; the assessment of ability, achievement, aptitude, interest, and personality; alternative forms of evaluation, such as process and product assessment; the interpretation of standardized test data; the reporting of evaluative results; and trends and issues in instructional evaluation.

EDCI 685/785 E-Learning (3)

Educational issues specific to online learning, both as a supplement to or a substitute for face-to-face interaction. Attention is given to principles and strategies of teaching and learning online and how they differ from traditional methods, curriculum and instructional design issues relating to online environments, online assessment strategies and tools, and an introduction to administrative and technical support, together with actual course development applications. The course will provide students with hands-on experience in an online environment. Prerequisites: a graduate course in curriculum, and EDCI 625 Instructional Media.

EDCI 730 Advanced Curriculum Theory (3)

Streams of curricular thought based on extant literature. Consideration is given to the shifts of perspective in curricular theory over time, primarily throughout the twentieth century, leading to the present; the relationship of curriculum theory to major philosophical frameworks and assumptions; the interaction of the commonplaces of curriculum, and the dominant models of curriculum. Prerequisite: EDCI 620 Foundations of Curriculum or EDCI 640 Process of Curriculum.

EDCI 750 Seminar in Curriculum and Instruction (3)

Current and emerging topics in curriculum and instruction within a seminar format. The course will consist of structured discussions, research based presentations, and presentations of position papers.

EDCI 765 Advanced Instructional Processes (3)

Introduction and practice of advanced teaching strategies that rely on systematic instruction based upon theory, research, and scholarly thinking in specific disciplines. It relies substantively on digital teaching/learning tools, dispositions, and skills of the 21st century. Designed to increase teaching repertoire, feedback, and support of others within the context of teaching/learning communities. (Prerequisites: EDCI 615, EDCI 625.) 

EDCI 780 Disciplinary Research Topics in Curriculum/Instruction (2-4)

Critical analysis of the research literature within a selected disciplinary topic. Classical and emerging literature are analyzed. Both a broad scan and a focused review of the literature are conducted. The purpose is to lay the foundation for the dissertation literature review. This course must be taken before, or concurrently with, EDCI 897.

Educational Foundations

Credits earned under an EDFN prefix do not apply toward a graduate degree in Education. Courses with an asterisk (*) are available as self-study modules.

EDFN 500 Fundamentals of English (3)

Basic English language skills in reading, writing, listening, speaking, and grammar. This course will develop Academic English skills such as fluency, accuracy, critical thinking, comprehension, and retention, preparing students to succeed in an English-medium educational environment. This course does not apply toward the MA in Education or the MAT in English Education.

EDFN 501 Methods of Learning and Instruction (2)*

An introduction to the methods and techniques of teaching based on major principles of learning. The course provides knowledge and skills of selecting and organizing teaching materials, developing instructional plans, and teaching selected content areas using a variety of research-based strategies.

EDFN 505 General Linguistics (1-3)

A survey of the main linguistic areas. The course introduces the major fields of general linguistics, providing the foundation needed in the understanding of language, language use, and language function. Itprovides an overview on syntax, lexicology, semantics, pragmatics, and morphology. This course may also include phonetics and phonology, and discourse analysis, should the number of credits allow it.

EDFN 506 English Composition (1-3)

A study of the fundamental writing principles and strategies. Techniques highlighted include writing complete sentences, paragraphs and essays with cohesion, clarity, structure, and appropriate vocabulary. The use of analytical thinking, argument, and critical thinking that takes writing from the initial brainstorming stage to the final product will be highlighted.

EDFN 508 Creative Writing (2)

A “workshop” introduction to the fundamental working models of creative writing, including poetry, short stories, essays, and prose. Students will read and analyze a wide range of literary texts, however, the principal focus of the class will be writing, both to apply techniques used by others, and to adapt them to the student’s own creative work. The major means of assessment will be a portfolio of the student’s creative and analytical written work.

EDFN 510 Teaching Practicum (1-3)

Experience-based instruction in actual school settings with the support of a mentor. Experiences will include classroom observations, preparation and delivery of learning activities, instructional evaluation, and exposure to instructional leadership.

EDFN 511 Higher Education Teaching Practicum (1-3)

Tertiary level teaching experience with support from a faculty mentor. Instructional activities will include developing a course outline, preparing the lesson and teaching, and implementing instructional evaluation.

EDFN 515 Teaching and Learning in Higher Education (3)

See EDCI 515 for course description.

EDFN 518 Educational Psychology (2)*

An introduction to psychological theories in education. Topics include learning theories and the nature of learning, including Christian goals of learning and learning as development. It also examines student diversity, barriers to learning, and Christian approaches to improving learning through effective classroom management, motivation, and instructional activities.

EDFN 520 Philosophy of Adventist Education (2)*

A comprehensive in-depth study of the underlying philosophy of Adventist education, emphasizing the complementary functions of the church and the school in the education-redemption process. In the context of the great controversy between good and evil, the course explores such topics as thenature of the student; the nurturance of faith, practical godliness, and personal piety.

EDFN 525 Instructional Evaluation (2)*

An exploration of the purposes and procedures used in assessing student learning. This course will introduce basic terminology and strategies related to both formative and summative evaluation of instruction. A thorough discussion of designing, constructing, administering and grading classroom tests and using authentic assessment will be included. 

Instructional Technology

EDIT 660 Educational Information Systems (3)

A study of the design, establishment, operation, and control of integrated, computer-based information systems that can support the educational process. Topics discussed include the structuring of information systems for educational purposes, hardware and software systems and their effects on learning, quality assurance, information gathering, storage, retrieval, and control. Credit may not be earned in both EDIT 660 and BUIT 660.

EDIT 662 Managing Technology in Schools (Hardware & Software) (3)

The role of technology management in schools. This course provides basic knowledge and skills necessary to maintain software and hardware in an educational institution. Students will learn basic maintenance, including an introduction to networking and security, how to select, install and update software, troubleshoot and upgrade hardware components, maintain and replace computer parts, and assemble and disassemble microcomputer systems. The course will also cover computer system management, and how to plan, and organize, and maintain the computer system in a school,identifying and anticipating educational needs and system failure, and providing proper solutions.

EDIT 668 Telecommunications, Networking and Security (3)

See BUIT 668 for course description.

EDIT 674 Database Applications (3)

See BUIT 674 for course description.

EDIT 681 E-Marketing for Education (3)

Principles of digital imaging and design for the production of marketing materials for education. The focus of this course includes concepts such as digital image preparation, internet marketing analysis and strategy, and building the institutional image through digital media. Students will explore various skills in digital imaging, and will develop digital marketing materials for institutional uses. Credit may not be earned in both EDIT 681 and BUIT 681.

EDIT 682 Web Tools for Education (3)

The use of Internet technologies to facilitate the educational process. Topics covered include fundamentals of design for the World Wide Web, graphics standards, web site hosting, and educational uses of internet technology. Students will gain basic skills in developing a simple web site. Students will explore and evaluate various web technology tools for education, and discuss trends and issues in web-based education. Students will complete a website development project, and design, produce, and evaluate web-based educational materials. Credit may not be earned in both EDIT 682 and BUIT 682.

EDIT 692 Fieldwork in Instructional Technology (3)

Instructional technology integration project. This course lays the groundwork for institutional planning for educational change in the area of technology. It includes planning, implementation, and reporting after the implementation has been completed. Plans may include teacher seminars, the development of educational materials, hardware and software acquisition, or other appropriate activities. Students should expect to spend a minimum of 180 clock hours on fieldwork activities in total.

Religious Education

EDRE 612 Pastoral Care and Counseling (3)

See CHMN 612 for course description.

EDRE 635 Youth Ministry (3)

See CHMN 635 for course description.

EDRE 679 Ministry and Spiritual Life (3)

See CHMN 679 for course description.

EDRE 710 Seminar in Family Life Issues (3)

See PHFN 625 for course description. Also identical to CHMN 710.

 

Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)

EDTE 500 Fundamentals of English (3)

Basic English language skills in reading, writing, listening, speaking, and grammar. This course will develop Academic English skills such as fluency, accuracy, critical thinking, comprehension, and retention, preparing students to succeed in an English- medium educational environment. This course does not apply toward the MA in Education or the MAT in English Education.

EDTE 520 Applied Grammar for Teachers (3)

A simplified version of EDTE 580 Advanced Grammar for Language Teaching. Designed for content specialists who will be teaching in English. An introduction to English grammar, syntax, and usage patterns, and methods of presenting them to language learners. Course will include grammatical concepts, as well as techniques for helping students acquire grammatical patterns.

EDTE 521 Writing Across the Curriculum (3)

A course designed to develop English writing skills, and to prepare teachers to develop similar skills in their own students as they teach their own content subjects. Includes structure and organization, grammar and punctuation, and thinking and reasoning skills, as well as creative ways of integrating writing into every subject as a means of learning.

EDTE 523 Teaching Developmental Reading for Language Learners (3)

A study of the role of content courses in the development of reading, comprehension, vocabulary, and thinking skills. Emphasis is placed on comprehension, retention, and vocabulary development skills needed by language learners across the content areas. The course includes a survey of appropriate teaching aids suitable for all learners, including criticalevaluation, media literacy, and addressing underlying issues such as bias, power, and culture.

EDTE 528 TESOL Methods in Speaking and Listening (3)

An introduction to concepts of phonetics and phonology for language teachers. Techniques for teaching pronunciation, and assisting learners in gaining fluency and grammatical accuracy in real-time oral language production, as well as for developing general and specific listening skills. Includes selection of materials, testing, group, and laboratory techniques for oral skills development. Class activities include observation and teaching practice at various ages and levels of language ability.

EDTE 580 Advanced Grammar for English Language Teaching (3)

English grammar, syntax, and usage patterns, and methods of presenting them to language learners. Course will include advanced grammatical concepts, as well as techniques, curricula, and materials for language teaching, and testing of grammar-related content. Includes observation and teaching practice at various ages and levels of language ability.

EDTE 620 Second Language Acquisition (3)

An overview of theories of first and second language acquisition, including comprehensible input, the monitor hypothesis, and order of acquisition. The role of linguistics in understanding language acquisition. The differences between learning and acquisition, EFL, ESL, and ESP, pedagogy and andragogy, integrative and instrumental motivation. Traditional and current approaches to language teaching will be discussed, including grammar/translation approaches, and communicative language teaching.

EDTE 622 TESOL Methods for Content-Area Reading and Writing (3)

A study of the role of content courses in the development of reading and writing, grammar, vocabulary, and thinking skills. Emphasis is placed on the integration of writing and study skills in order to enhance retention in all content areas. The course includes a survey of appropriate teaching aids suitable for all learners, incorporating critical evaluation of numerical data, technology, and media literacy, including underlying issues such as bias, power, and culture. Experiences in the class include observation and teaching practice at various ages and levels of language ability.

EDTE 630 Pragmatics (3)

An overview of the cultural development and history of the English language. Effects of culture on language learning. How language and culture overlap, interact, and influence each other. How to manage, read, and adapt cultural indicators to language learning. Directness, intensity, proper social behavior, power relations, and other pragmatic issues that affect language learning contexts.

EDTE 689 Evaluation and Design of TESOL Materials (3)

An instructional guide in how to find TESOL materials, evaluate them, and adapt them to meet the needs of different English language learners’ needs. The course also provides students a large selection of strategies used to design texts, tasks, and instructional activities for English language learners.

Education

EDUC 526 Pedagogical Foundations (3)

A course designed to improve basic teaching practices. The emphasis will include both teaching/learning concepts such as philosophical assumptions of learning and nature of learners, and teaching/learning processes apply to all ages and all subject matter. Participants become a member of a study group and present teaching episodes and participate in structured coaching and focused feedback processes.

EDUC 600/700 Orientation to Graduate Studies

Introduction of graduate studies at AIIAS Graduate School. The purpose is to initiate the student into the AIIAS Graduate School culture. Topics will include study of mind/learning styles, personal learning characteristics, graduate study skills including familiarity with the use of digital tools, formation of professional learning communities, and preparation of an individual course plan from an Adventist perspective.

EDUC 582 Foundations of Christian Curriculum (3)

A survey of the historical, philosophical, psychological, and sociological foundations of education. Emphasis is given to the relationship of these foundational areas to the design and practice of contemporary Christian education.

EDUC 600/700 Orientation to Graduate Studies 

Introduction of graduate studies at AIIAS Graduate School. The purpose is to initiate the student into the AIIAS Graduate School culture. Topics will include study of mind/learning styles, personal learning characteristics, graduate study skills including familiarity with the use of digital tools, formation of professional learning communities, and preparation of an individual course plan from an Adventist perspective.

EDUC 602 Introduction to Counseling (3)

An introduction to the counseling profession in school and community setting. This course includes historical development, theoretical approaches, professional issues, and current trends in counseling, as well as an examination of Christian counseling models. Emphasis is given to the role and functions of counselors in varied settings.

EDUC 620 Developmental Psychology (3)

Study of physical, intellectual, personality, social, and emotional development from conception through the lifespan, examined through an ecological framework. This course examines particular needs of individuals and families throughout the life cycle from a range of cultural perspectives, and how aspects of family formation impact on human development.

EDUC 624 Faith and Learning in Christian Education (3)

Interdisciplinary consideration of Christ-centered, Bible-based, faith-nurturing educational theory and practice. This class will assist students in developing a personal, experiential faith and a balanced lifestyle in which the spiritual aspects of life blend naturally with day-to-day activities, as beliefs, values, experiences, and attitudes of their Christian worldview are integrated into the total school environment.

 

Directed Studies

The following courses may be offered within any degree program. The degree program prefixes, omitted in this list, must be supplied at the time of registration.

_____588/688/788 Updating of (Original Course Name) (no credit)

Updating an outdated course is registered under the same prefix and first digit as the original course. The charge for this course will be equivalent to the fee for one credit in the student’s program, but no credit will be granted. For details, see the section entitled “Updating of Academic Credits” under Academic Information and Policies.

_____ 589/689 Elective Course in ____________ (1-3)

This will allow transfer credits and an occasional special course not specifically named in the Bulletin. Transferred courses should still appear as such on the transcript.

670/870 Independent Project in_____________ (1-3)

Independent projects enable students to develop advanced professional knowledge and competencies and to integrate theory and practice within their chosen profession in a way that is relevant and appropriate to their ongoing personal and professional goals. Projects may include the design and preparation of materials, design, implementation, analysis, and reporting of an intervention, or some other agreed-on application of theory. Open to students on a limited basis with departmental approval.

_____ 690/790 Directed Study (1-3)

Open to students only on a limited basis with departmental approval. Requires written/oral reports. Normally, Directed Study is limited to 3 credits per student per degree. Not available for core subjects without ASAC approval.

_____ 692/792 Fieldwork/Advanced Fieldwork in (1-3)

Open to students only on a limited basis with departmental approval. Provides graduate students with opportunities to deepen and apply their learning in real-life settings not before experienced, and expands horizons through new types of professional interactions. Courses designated as fieldwork entail on-site experiences and activities in a setting appropriate to the degree being sought. Fieldwork courses may only be taken after half of the total number of credits for the respective degree program have been completed. Students are expected to spend a minimum of 60 clock hours in practicum activities for each semester hour of credit.

_____ 693/793 Advanced Readings in____________________ (1-3)

Open to students only on a limited basis with departmental approval. Requires extensive readings on an agreed topic with oral and written reports to the professor. Normally, Advanced Readings is limited to 3 units per student per degree. No Advanced Readings may be used in lieu of core requirements.

_____ 695/895 Directed Research in__________________ (1-3)

Open to students only on a limited basis and with departmental approval. A written report is required, normally in the form of a research paper. For a PhD level registration, review of literature, conceptual framework, research design, data collection, data analysis, and interpretation culminating in a publishable article is required. May be repeated for credit. 

Research Methods, Writing, and Statistics

RESM 520 Academic Writing (2)

Necessary skills for academic writing, including proper use of sources and avoiding plagiarism, organization, the basics of APA style, punctuation, and gender inclusive language. Academic writing ability and knowledge of research procedure is developed through class activities and feedback.

RESM 610 Research Methods (3)

Fundamental processes of research. This course introduces students to the terminology, methods, and tools of scholarly research. Specific topics include characteristics of historical, descriptive, quasi-experimental, experimental, and qualitative research; measurement considerations as related to validity, reliability, generalizability, instrumentation, and data analysis; and ethical concerns. The course also addresses the practical aspects of writing a thesis/project proposal, gathering data, organizing the report, and presenting the findings. Prerequisite: RESM 520 Academic Writing.

RESM 615 Statistics (3)

An introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics. Concepts covered in this course include measures of frequency, central tendency, and variation, transformed scores, normal distribution, central limit theorem, hypotheses testing, statistical power, and sampling. Students should be familiar with different kinds of distributions such as t, f, and chi-square and other basic measurements in statistics such as bivariate correlation (Pearson r), simple regression, and differences (t test). The use of non-parametric statistics is also introduced. ANOVA, and multiple comparison (post-hoc) tests are included. Students are expected to develop proficiency in using a major statistical package. If more than 5 years have elapsed since RESM 615 Statistics was taken, knowledge of statistics must be reviewed through audit of this course or by preparation for and taking of a proficiency examination before taking courses requiring Statistics as a prerequisite. Computer laboratory and software fees apply.

RESM 625 Action Research (3)

Theory, concepts, and practice of action research. The process is a disciplinary inquiry carried out by and for those practitioners to solve an immediate problem or improve practice. The research procedures include quantitative and qualitative tools. The participants will produce an action research study

RESM 630/730 Documentary Research (3)

Documentary and historical methods in obtaining primary and secondary information as well as verification and use in research. Prerequisites: RESM 520 Academic Writing, RESM 610 Research Methods.

RESM 685 Research Experience (3)

Hands-on experience in designing, conducting, and reporting significant primary research in education. The end product should be a publishable scholarly article (2,000-3,000 words) or other substantial research report. The student should plan to spend a minimum of 60 clock hours in research activities for each semester hour of credit. Does not count toward the requirements for the PhD degree. Prerequisites: RESM 520 Academic Writing, RESM 610 Research Methods, RESM 615 Statistics recommended.

_____ 694 MA Culminating Project (3)

The MA Project is a practical application of theory learned in the program studied. It may or may not involve data collection, but should serve some useful professional purpose. Prerequisite: completion of all required courses or permission of the department. See Departmental Guidelines for details.

_____ 698 MA Thesis (3-6)

The thesis is a potential culminating activity for many Graduate School master's degrees. It consists of qualitative and/or quantitative research that validates or improves existing theory and makes a unique contribution to knowledge in the selected area of study. Research designs could include evaluation, descriptive, or theory-oriented studies. See Graduate School and Departmental Guidelines for details.

RESM 715 Advanced Statistics (3)

Theory and applications of multivariate statistics. Topics include factorial ANOVA, multiple regression, multiple discriminant analyses, logistical regression, multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA, MANCOVA), multidimensional scaling, cluster analysis, and factor analysis. Computer laboratory and software fees apply. Students who took basic statistics more than 5 years ago must audit RESM 615 or pass a proficiency examination before enrolling in this class. Prerequisites: RESM 615 Statistics (or its equivalent).

RESM 720 Nonparametric Statistics (3)

Theory and application of nonparametric methods for analysis of nominal and ordinal data and distribution-free tests, including rank tests for matched and independent samples, chi-square and goodness-of-fit tests, McNemar’s test, rank correlation, k-sample test, randomizations test, and Kolmogorov- Smirnov statistics. Prerequisite: RESM 615 Statistics, RESM 520 Academic Writing recommended.

RESM 740 Qualitative Research Methods (3)

An overview of the research traditions in qualitative research. The range will consist of research methods from criticism to inductive science. Philosophical assumptions; psychological and anthropological perspectives; inductive, deductive, and abductive thought processes will be considered with a personal worldview and values orientation. The purpose is make thoughtful and considered decisions about personal choices of research methods available and suitable or appropriate for conducting research.

RESM 745 Construction of Scales and Survey Instruments (3)

Theoretical and empirical study of the development of (1) survey instruments such as questionnaires and interview schedules, and (2) attitude scales and personality instruments. Topics include principles and procedures of survey methodology, sampling techniques and sample size, reliability and validity, scaling, item analysis and selection, non-response problems, data coding and processing, and presentation of results. Practical experience is gained by constructing an instrument and/or completing a survey project. Computer laboratory and software fees apply. Prerequisite: RESM 615 Statistics.

RESM 751 Applied Qualitative Research Methods (1-3)

Examination of a qualitative research method including the question of purpose, design, interpretation, and presentation of findings. The first part of the course would include the philosophy, theory, and the step-by-step processes included in a particular research design. The second part of the course would consist of conducting a study using this design in the field.

RESM 752 Applied Multivariate Analysis (3)

Applications of multivariate statistics (a continuation of topics introduced in RESM 715). In addition, topics include introduction to construction of scales, path analysis, and structural equation modeling. The applications would be related to the quantitative research designs. This should lead to discussion and analyses of the areas of students’ dissertation interests. Prerequisite: RESM 715 Advanced Statistics (3).

RESM 770 Institutional Evaluation (3)

An explanation of and justification for evaluation strategies at both departmental and institutional levels, from the perspective of both the practitioner and the evaluator. The course emphasizes the building of evaluation criteria, self-study, methods of data collection, organization and analysis, the drawing of inferences and the framing of recommendations consistent with the mission and philosophy of the institution or program being evaluated.

_____796 EdS Culminating Project (3-6)

The EdS Project is an advanced educational application of theory learned in the program studied. It may involve data collection, and should serve some useful educational purpose. See Departmental Guidelines for details.

_____ 897 Dissertation Proposal Writing (1-3)

A part of the culminating activity. Of the 3 credits, 1 credit is for topic approval. During this phase, students develop the topic of the dissertation and justify its pursuance in consultation with the advising committee. The remaining 2 credits are for proposal writing and approval. Only an S/U grade is earned.

_____ 898 PhD Dissertation (3-12)

A required culminating activity for all doctoral degree students. It consists of original, primary research that makes a unique contribution to knowledge in the selected area of study. Only an S/U grade is earned. Continuous registration is required until the completion of the dissertation . Prerequisite: BUAD/EDAD/EDCI 897, candidacy status or approval of the department. See Departmental Guidelines for details.

 

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