Menu

Business

______629/729/829 Topics in _____________ (3)

A study of current topics, issues and debates in the discipline. Emergent themes and competing ideas in contemporary literature will be covered to give students a wider perspective of the subject area. Students may complete up to a total of three topics courses, i.e., a maximum of 9 semester credits. Only 3 credits, from a level, may be used in an emphasis. PhD level registration will involve a deeper exploratory readings and study on the current issues.

 

Accounting

ACCT 645 Managerial Accounting and Control (3)

Managerial decision making and financial planning through accounting analysis. Special attention is given to cost analysis and control, cost allocation, budgeting, financial analysis, and behavioral aspects of accounting.

ACCT 648 Accounting for Non-Profit Organizations (3)

A course designed to assist user-decision makers in understanding and applying accounting concepts related to not-for-profit organizations. The course emphasizes the applications of accounting as a tool for management control in non-business organizations. Special attention is given to financial statement presentation, analysis, and interpretation.

ACCT 651, 652 Financial Accounting I, II (3), (3)

These two courses involve in-depth study of accounting theories and practices relating to asset, liability, and equity measurements and reporting; revenue and expense determination; and preparation and presentation of financial statements. The courses cover topics that were covered in intermediate accounting but in much greater depth. They are designed for MBA students who will be taking up work in organizational accounting and finance, and denominational accounting and treasury positions.

ACCT 654 Financial Analysis and Reporting (3)

A study of what, how, and where key financial analytical tools are generally used to come up with solutions in management decisions in the areas of investments, finances, and operation. It consists of business performance evaluation, earnings per share (ESP) growth analysis, LBO analysis, special evaluation of the firm, M & A, and financial reporting techniques for decision making. Prerequisite: FNCE 640 Financial Management.

ACCT 657 Fund Accounting (3)

A course designed to assist user-decision makers in understanding and applying accounting concepts related to not-for-profit organizations. Thecourse emphasizes the applications of accounting as a tool for management control in non-business organizations. Special attention is given to financial statement presentation, analysis, and interpretation.

ACCT 660 Auditing and Assurance (3)

A study of auditing theory, historical and current developments including statements of auditing standards and other pronouncements of the audit profession, examination of the concepts and problems including ethics and responsibilities. Emphasis is placed on the application of theory to problem solving and cases. Contemporary professional issues including auditing through the computer and statistical sampling will also be examined.

ACCT 675 Accounting for Corporate Structures (3)

These two courses involve in-depth study of accounting theories and practices relating to asset, liability, and equity measurements and reporting; revenue and expense determination; and preparation and presentation of financial statements. The courses cover topics that were covered in intermediate accounting but in much greater depth. They are designed for MBA students who will be taking up work in organizational accounting and finance, and denominational accounting and treasury positions.

ACCT 680/780 Financial Accounting Theory (3)

An in-depth study, analysis and evaluation of accounting theory (theory and method, measurement and accounting theory construction); alternative models to the historical model of accounting; empirical research in accounting: (positive theory of accounting) and accounting regulation (conceptual framework and accounting standards); and other specific issues. Graduate registration involves a study of advanced Accounting Theory, Prerequisite: Financial Accounting II

ACCT 685/785 Current Issues & Developments in Accounting (3)

This course is designed to cover current issues and developments in financial accounting. The topics covered depend on the current issues in the field of financial accounting. It is designed to familiarize students with current issues and problems facing the accounting profession, to examine in depth various solutions proposed by accounting scholars and others, and to strengthen students’ understanding of today’s critical issues in accounting theory. Graduate registration involves a study of advanced issues in accounting. Pre-requisite: Financial Accounting II

 

Business Administration

BUAD 595 Business Practicum (3)

Students who have less than one year of full-time work experience are required to spend at least 160 clock hours in a business-related practicum in a chosen workplace with the approval of the business department. At the end of the business practicum the student is required to produce a report about the experience gained and the contribution made in the assigned workplace.

BUAD 615 Marketing Management (3)

A course designed to enable the student to develop and implement marketing strategies. Both the local and global marketplace are considered in analyzing marketing opportunities; selecting target markets; designing marketing programs; and organizing, implementing, and controlling marketing efforts.

BUAD 618 Marketing for Not-for-Profit Organizations (3)

Application of marketing concepts and tools to not-for-profit organizations. Concepts and techniques covered include selection of target markets, marketing mix, marketing program development, implementation, and control of marketing strategies.

BUAD 635 Quantitative Analysis for Decision Making (3)

This course offers the opportunity to apply mathematical models and tools for the analysis of business problems and management decision making. It acquaints students with quantitative techniques commonly used in the decision-making process. Sample topics include concepts of decision making and decision analysis, linear programming, sensitivity analysis, transportation and assignments, problem forecasting and time series analysis, inventory concepts, network models, and mathematical simulations and game theory.

BUAD 691 Strategic Management (3)

This course provides the students with theory and practice in strategic management by the use of lectures and case analysis. It helps build in students critical business skills of planning and managing strategic activities. Topics include determining mission, purpose and philosophy of companies, developing a company profile, conducting a resource analysis, assessing the external environment, identifying various strategic options, making strategic analysis and choice, setting long-term objectives, developing long-term annual objectives and grand strategies, implementing strategic decisions, reviewing, and finally, controlling them.

Note: This is the capstone course for the MBA program and can only be taken after substantial completion of all other requirements, usually in the last semester, just prior to graduation. It is integrative in nature, requiring the student to put to use the skills and knowledge gained throughout the course of study.

BUAD 694 Master’s Project (3)

Masters Project may be taken as a culminating activity for MSA students. The course is designed to give students experience in enhancing practice in the workplace. Master’s Projects involve problem identification, antecedents or root cause analysis, literature review, alternative solution generation, intervention recommendations, and project impact evaluation. Candidates registering for BUAD 694 Masters Projects are required to do the following:

1. Identify the problem in practice,

2. Research the antecedents of the problem from the perspective of practitioners,

3. Research from literature the reasons why the problem exists,

4. Generate possible solutions to solving the problem (at least three),

5. Recommend solution to address the problem and provide justifications,

6. Design an intervention that would implement the suggested solution, and

7. Measure the intervention’s effectiveness.

BUAD 696 Research Project (3)

Guided independent research project to demonstrate the student’s skills in research procedures, analysis, and decision making. Selected project formats may include feasibility studies, case studies, and the development of problem-solving approaches in other management functional areas. Prerequisite: Completion of all required courses, or permission of the program director.

BUAD 697 Internship (1-4)

Students who have less than two years of managerial work experience may spend up to 240 clock-hours in a business-related internship (spread over a period of 3-6 months) in a chosen organization with the approval of the department. At the end of the internship the student is required to produce a report about the experience gained and the contribution made to the organization.

BUAD 698 MBA Thesis (3-6)

Guided independent research to demonstrate the student’s skills in the use of the research design. The research process typically includes description of the problem and purpose of the study, limitations/delimitations, literature review, methodology, data presentation and analysis, conclusions, and recommendations. Included in the thesis credits is a seminar in research during which the thesis proposal is developed. Prerequisite: RESM 610 Research Methods and completion of all required courses, or permission of the program director.

BUAD 730 Quality of Knowledge Management (3)

Provides a strategic and structured approach to designing, monitoring, and improving business processes to enhance organizational performance and increase customer satisfaction. Topics include quality perspectives, quality theory, quality standards and awards, quality planning, customer focus, benchmarking, product and process design, service quality design, supply chain management, quality tools, quality improvement teams and projects, statistical process control, process capability, quality training, quality audits, and organizational learning.

BUAD 735 Ethics, Values, and Moral Leadership (3)

A blend of theoretical and real-world situations designed to enable the student to understand and apply moral theory to personal and professional life. This is accomplished through reading, research, interaction with other students and classroom presentations.

BUAD 778 Advanced Management Decision Tools (3)

An advanced level course in quantitative analysis theory, techniques, and tools to support and facilitate management decision-making. It includes financial, statistical, and operational modeling. Specific topics that may be covered are decision making, marketing research, quality control, forecasting, and scenario generation, linear programing, stock control, project management, simulation and financial decision making.                                                   

BUAD 785 Leadership and Corporate Governance (3)

        A critical examination of traditional, contemporary, and Biblical leadership theories and concepts. It will also evaluate the relative advantages and disadvantages of      different approaches to leadership, recognize current trends and development in leadership and apply advanced leadership skills to different organizational situations.           The focus will be on leadership roles such as visioning, mentoring, team building, making ethical judgments with informed analysis/reasoning, leading change, leading         during crises and influencing business behaviour in an ethical manner towards organizational goals and mission. The course will also critically evaluate the theories of           corporate governance, and their empirical testing. A distinction will be made between good and bad corporate governance. The student will also learn to analyse the             mechanisms of corporate governance and evaluate the role of internal gatekeepers and external regulators in ensuring good Corporate Governance. Further, the course         will also discuss the mechanism by which shareholders, Board of Directors, CEOs, managers, and other stakeholders direct and control corporations and organizations.

Business Informational Technology

BUIT 660 Management Information Systems (3)

Students learn to establish, operate, and control integrated, computer based information systems to support management decision making. Topics discussed include structuring of information systems, hardware and software systems, quality assurance, information gathering, storage, retrieval, and control.

BUIT 662 Information Technology Management (3)

Role of information technology in operations, decision making, and learning in organizations. Competitive and economic benefits from managing information technology resources. How information technology can achieve competitive advantage, efficient operations, and improved decision quality. Prerequisite: BUIT 660 Management Information Systems.

BUIT 672 Systems Analysis and Design (3)

Provides an understanding of the system development, modification, decision process, and choices in business process development and reengineering methodology. Emphasizes integration with users and user systems. Encourages interpersonal skill development, operations and maintenance of the system, and covers quality and decision theory, information theory, and practice.

BUIT 674 Database Applications (3)

Covers information systems design, theory and implementation within a database management system environment. Students demonstrate their mastery of the design process by designing and constructing a physical system using database software to implement the logical design.

BUIT 681 E-Marketing (3)

Principles of digital imaging and design for the production of marketing materials. The focus of this course includes concepts such as digital image preparation, corporate identity, consumer behavior, website analysis and internet behavior, digital marketing, and the digital economy. Various marketing, and communication strategies for internet marketing will also be investigated and evaluated. Students will develop an e-marketing plan, a video production, a personal website, and various marketing materials. Class size will be limited. Requires payment of a computer laboratory fee. Credit may not be earned in both BUAD 681 and EDIT 681.

BUIT 682 E-Business (3)

An introduction to electronic business with a focus on business planning, e-strategy and implementation, and project assessment for online business. Topics covered include fundamentals of e-commerce, principles of Web design, and online business strategy and management. Students will explore and evaluate web technology tools for online business, and discuss various trends and issues in electronic business. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking and evaluation skills as well as managerial and entrepreneurial skills. Students will form business/consulting teams to plan, develop, launch, and maintain an online business, or assist a small business in establishing a web presence. Class size will be limited. Requires payment of a computer laboratory fee. Credit may not be earned in both BUIT 682 and EDIT 682.

BUIT 684 Telecommunications, Networking, and Security (3)

Fundamentals of telecommunications, basic network design, and network security concepts in organizations are discussed. The course will include a general introduction to networking technology for setting up local area network for the organization. Information security principles covered will include network, data, and personal security. Implications of network access and security issues for organizations and their members will be discussed.

BUIT 692 Fieldwork in Information Technology

Fieldwork in the area of information technology provides students with experiences closely relating IT theory and practice. The fieldwork experience may take a number of forms: IT Management assistance and consultation, working as part of a team in the development of IT projects, or the preparation and presentation of an IT seminar. In any case, the setting and activities are especially designed to accommodate the student’s interests and needs.

If IT Management assistance and consultation modality is chosen, the student is expected to assist the IT management. The purpose of this modality is for the student to put into practice various IT strategies that have been learned. The student is given preference as to what department and institution in which to carry out the fieldwork, subject to availability.

The development of IT project modality typically involves collaboration with a professional or team of professionals in planning, designing, constructing, field testing, modifying, and evaluating an IT project. Such involvement will often extend over a period of several months.

In the seminar modality, the fieldwork typically focuses on the development, implementation, and evaluation of an IT seminar of at least 10 clock hours which responds to an assessed need evident in the field. Comprehensive instructional materials are to be developed for both the seminar instructor and participants. A formal evaluation of the seminar is to be conducted and documented. The final product resulting from the fieldwork experience should reflect recommended modifications.

BUIT 760 Seminar in Information Technology Management (3)

Leading edge Information Technology management issues will be addressed. Topics will vary as technology evolves, but could include virtual teams, knowledge management, justifying IT investments, business process change through technology, web-based systems, software project management, outsourcing, and evolving IT management roles. Prerequisite: BUIT 660 Management Information Systems.

 

Economics

ECON 620 Microeconomic Analysis and Decision Making (3)

The application of microeconomics to management decision making and organizational architecture, with special focus on decision rights, performance evaluation, and rewards. Coverage includes decisions on pricing, cost, optimal output levels, product mix, vertical integration, and outsourcing. The impact of government policy on the firm is also studied.

ECON 622 Economic Issues for Managers (3)

Analysis of current topics and issues in macroeconomics. Topics covered include employment, inflation, fiscal policy, monetary policy, international trade, economic development and issues, new world economic order, and regional economic associations.

ECON 765 Advanced Economic Theory (3)

Covers selected topics in microeconomics, macroeconomics, international trade, developmental economics and labor economics. Emphasis will be on reading, analyzing, critiquing and synthesizing recent ideas published in current journal articles on economic related issues.

 

Finance

FNCE 638 Financial Forecasting Models (3)

A study of quantitative models using simulation for forecasting and decision making under risk. The course focuses on using the computer to solve complex problems involving uncertainty. Students will become familiar with optimization software, Microsoft Excel’s Solver and Excel plug-ins. Prerequisites: Business Statistics; BUAD 635 Quantitative Analysis for Decision Making; and FNCE 640 Financial Management.

FNCE 640 Financial Management (3)

A course focusing on the investing and financing activities of a corporation. Topics covered include the concept and application of risk, return, and value; cost of capital and capital budgeting; working capital management; capital structure; and international aspects of financial management.

FNCE 642 Investments (3)

A study of the securities market, current issues in investment portfolio management, analysis of fixed-income and equity securities, and derivatives as investment alternatives as pre-requisite knowledge for a better comprehension to financial risk management.

FNCE 644 Banking Systems (3)

A study of how banks are prudently managed to comply with Central Bank’s regulations. Principles of prudent management cover topics such as value creation, CAMEL (capital, assets coverage/quality, management,earnings capacity/quality, and liquidity) compliance, asset-liability management, loan portfolio management, and related topics.

FNCE 646 Finance for Not-for-Profit Organizations (3)

Analysis of the financial and economic aspects of the administration of not-for-profit educational institutions, including sources of long-term financing, resource management, planning the use of funds, internal control, capital budgeting, risk and return analysis, and cost control. The course will also include an extensive discussion on Ellen G. White’s writings on prudent finances. Credit may not be earned in both EDAD 730 and FNCE 646.

FNCE 648 Accounting for Non-Profit Organizations (3)

See ACCT 648 for course description.

FNCE 652 Trade Finance (3)

A study of how international trade is financed by banks and how business ventures take advantage of the financing facility. It covers working knowledge of importing, exporting, L/C (letter of credit facility) and the related negotiable documents, exchange risk management, country risk, export credit insurance, and related topics.

FNCE 654 Financial Analysis and Reporting (3)

A study of what, how, and where key financial analytical tools are generally used to come up with solutions in management decisions in the areas of investments, finances, and operation. It consists of business performance evaluation, earnings per share (ESP) growth analysis, LBO analysis, special evaluation of the firm, M & A, and financial reporting techniques for decision making. Prerequisite: FNCE 640 Financial Management.

FNCE 656 International Finance (3)

A study of international financial management and its various techniques of how multinational corporations manage their day-to-day affairs in light of exchange risk exposure. It focuses on the international financial environment, foreign exchange risk management, capital markets and financing instruments, and direct foreign investment decisions.

FNCE 657 Fund Accounting (3)

See ACCT 657 for course description.

FNCE 658 Financial Risk Management (3)

A study of how corporations safeguard their financial and investment decisions against business risk, foreign exchange exposure, liquidity unavailability, stock and commodity prices fluctuation, interest rates fluctuation, and so on. It focuses on hedging techniques, special financial engineering for special financial problem solving and insurance management. Prerequisites: FNCE 640 Financial Management and either FNCE 642 Investments or FNCE 654 Financial Analysis and Reporting.

FNCE 740 Seminar in Financial Management (3)

A study of research in the field of financial management practices in the areas of corporate, government and Adventist organizational policies. The course is comprised of the following subjects: the institutions affecting the practice of financial management, corporate short-term and long-term financing, including that of mergers and acquisitions for financial growth; money and banking, including how the Bureau of Treasury raises government’s financing; and prudent financial policies implementation in an Adventist organization through the financial statement analysis according to the General Conference policies. The students are required to present the above mostly in the form of financial research presentation, which culminates into scholarly presentation as well as publication. Prerequisite: FNCE 640 Financial Management.

Management

MGMT 602 Managerial Communication (3)

The theory and practice of effective communication techniques and strategies in a global work environment are studied. Emphasis is placed on competency in verbal, nonverbal, written, interpersonal, group interaction, and presentation skills. Study is given to ways in which students can adapt their communications to the specific needs of their audiences and make use of new communication technologies. Students are challenged to creatively analyze various communication dilemmas in business and develop sincere, ethical approaches to upward, lateral and downward communication in their organizations.

MGMT 610 Organizational Behavior (3)

Application of behavioral science concepts within a Christian ethics framework. The emphasis is on understanding how individuals and groups behave in organizations, and the development of a moral organizational culture. Topics of interest include perception, values, attitude, motivation, group behavior, communication, leadership, power, politics, conflict, organizational culture, and organizational change.

MGMT 612 Human Resource Management (3)

Integration of human resource programs into organization strategy to support long-term competitive strategies. The emphasis is on human resource planning, attracting, selecting and retaining competent personnel, managing human resource flow, training and development, performance appraisal, employee welfare and compensation, labor relations, collective bargaining, discipline handling, and dispute resolution.

MGMT 624 Entrepreneurship (3)

Principles, problems and issues in organizing a new venture in small business. Topics covered include creating entrepreneurial spirit, generating business ideas, writing business plans, analyzing feasibility, financing startups, organizing small scale businesses, and operating a new enterprise.

MGMT 626 International Business Management (3)

Analysis of the nature and scope of international business in the global market economy. Topics covered include international business environments, the framework for international transactions, global strategies, and cross-cultural concerns in management.

MGMT 676 Project Management (3)

The course covers project planning and tracking, performance metrics and performance evaluation, as well as recruiting, retention, career planning, team building, quality control, negotiation, risk analysis, and legal issues.

MGMT 720 Management Thought and Philosophy (3)

Historical and contemporary theories of administration and their application in today's world. Particular attention is focused on the context (history, politics, religion, economics, geography) in which the theories emerge, and their implications for Christians. The course aims to provide an understanding of the major philosophical and theoretical underpinnings of management thinking and practice. Credit may not be earned in both MGMT 720 and EDAD 720.

MGMT 725 Change and Crisis Management (3)

Examines contemporary theories, conceptual frameworks and best practices in managing organizational change and preventing and managing crisis. The course will enhance student’s competence in the area of understanding trends, identifying needs for change, overcoming resistance for change, designing programs for change, implementing change, sticking change, spreading change and controlling change. Further, it will also prepare students in anticipating crisis and its impact, planning for crisis, developing a crisis plan, managing crisis when and if it happens and learning from crisis. Prerequisite: MGMT 610 Organizational Behavior.

Academic Bulletin

Full details about Academic Information can be found in our bulletin. 

Download Bulletin

Academic Calendar

Go to top